The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

economic-growth  oil-and-natural-gas  technology  energy-policy 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted January 11, 2018

Metropolitan areas that are near natural gas, oil and mining activity have been exceptionally productive and able to sustain high productivity over time, according to a recent Brookings Institution study. While overall U.S. productivity has continued to slow, metro area participation in the energy and technology booms has become a precursor of high productivity and growth.

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state-of-american-energy  american-petroleum-institute  power-past-impossible  technology  innovation  oil-and-natural-gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 9, 2018

State of American Energy 2018API President and CEO Jack Gerard described the natural gas and oil industry as technologically advanced, innovative and forward looking – all critically important to continued delivery of the energy Americans use every day for transportation, essential consumer products, life-saving technologies and more. Our industry is up to helping Americans meet the challenges of today and tomorrow – endeavors that hinge on energy.

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the-environmental-partnership  emission-reductions  technology  greenhouse-gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 13, 2017

With last week’s launch of The Environmental Partnership, let’s take a more detailed look at the three emissions-reducing programs more than two dozen participating companies have announced as their initial focus: pneumatic controller upgrades, leak detection and well liquids removal. These sound a little technical, yet you don’t have to be a petroleum engineer to understand why the partnership has prioritized them at launch.

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american-petroleum-institute  environmental-impact  innovation  technology 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 3, 2017

API is on the move. Reflecting the advanced technologies that natural gas and oil bring to energy production and our commitment to reducing our environmental footprint, the industry’s leading national trade association plans to move next year to a new, self-sustaining LEED Platinum-certified building in downtown Washington, D.C., that will include a number of innovative features.

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offshore-energy  oil-and-natural-gas  technology  workforce  education 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 3, 2017

The great point here is the connectivity between different sectors of a modern economy and the importance of consistent growth, particularly for our industry. For the country, finding and developing the oil and natural gas that’s involved with virtually every aspect of modern living is key to future economic growth, energy security and security overall. 

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oil-and-natural-gas  innovation  technology  horizontal-drilling 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 7, 2016

The degree to which industry innovation and advanced technology is driving America’s energy renaissance is a good-news story that doesn’t get enough attention. Let’s see if we can take a step in that direction.

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natural-gas  methane  emission-reductions  climate  technology 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted September 16, 2016

The U.S. oil and natural gas industry has proven that we can develop the energy that our economy relies upon here at home, while ensuring that those resources are developed safely and responsibly. This includes developing and applying technologies and best practices that effectively reduce emissions of methane, which is the key component of natural gas and thus a vital product for our industry to bring to the U.S. market.

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carbon-capture  carbon-dioxide-emissions  technology  innovation  exxonmobil 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 18, 2016

It doesn’t get enough notice: The U.S. energy renaissance is a revolution built on advanced technology and the ongoing quest to problem solve.

One of the best examples is hydraulic fracturing, the most important reason the United States leads the world in oil and natural gas production. Industry innovators took a process used for more than 60 years, modernized it and married it with it with advanced horizontal drilling to safely unleash previously inaccessible oil and natural gas reserves from shale and other tight-rock formations. It transformed America’s energy picture from one of scarcity and dependence to one of abundance and greater self-sufficiency.

The moral: When conventional wisdom says something can’t be done, just wait. Necessity, innovation and technology are marvelous at proving conventional wisdom shortsighted or wrong. On advancing new energy technologies to develop oil and gas more efficiently and in ways that are better for the environment, our industry isn’t standing still.


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analysis  technology  investments  climate  greenhouse-gas-emissions  co234  methane  ozone  jack-gerard  american-petroleum-institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 22, 2015

Today, API released a new report on investments in greenhouse gas-mitigating measures that illustrates the oil and natural gas industry’s leadership in innovating the technologies and efficiencies to keep improving air quality. We conclude a series of posts on the intersection of energy development and climate/environmental goals (here, here and here) with a look at the new report.

Key numbers from T2 and Associates’ new report on investments in mitigating greenhouse gases (GHG) by industry include $90 billion in zero and low-carbon emitting technologies from 2000 through 2014.

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news  efficiency  innovation  technology  shale-energy  pipelines  ethanol  energy-exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 8, 2015

Platts (The Barrel Blog)When OPEC left production unchanged in November last year many understood it to be US or Canadian tight oil producers who would suffer, but thanks to technological advances — to paraphrase Mark Twain — the reports of the death of the tight boom have been greatly exaggerated.

After OPEC’s announcement of stable production, crude prices fell under $50/b, and the obituaries began to be written.

But lower prices forced companies to become hyper-vigilant on costs, and the result was the opposite of what may have been intended. US and Canadian production continued to grow, and E&P companies became leaner and more efficient — leading to a more competitive industry.

The savings from technological advances and more efficient internal processes, unlike the drop in rig dayrates that could rise again when the market turns, will be a more permanent feature of the North American oil market.

The numbers tell the story. The North American oil rig count dropped from its peak in early October at 1,609 to 646 for the week-ending May 29, yet productions is headed in the opposite direction — US oil output hit 9.586 million b/d, its highest daily rate since the EIA began weekly production reports in 1983. The EIA recently forecast another million b/d of oil production growth until it peaks in 2020 at 10.603 million b/d.

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