The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

oil-and-natural-gas  energy-outlook  eia34  us-energy-security  air-quality 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 15, 2017

Putting together three big takeaways from EIA's report, the ongoing U.S. renaissance in natural gas and oil production puts America in a strong position for the future, especially in the context of rising world energy demand. Continued growth in domestic natural gas and oil production offers the U.S. a chance to grow in its energy self-sufficiency. 

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air-quality  emission-reductions  environmental-expenditures  epa34  ozone 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 3, 2017

America’s air is getting cleaner and cleaner, even as the economy continues growing. So says EPA’s latest annual report on air quality, which tracks improvements since 1970. Cleaner air during economic growth, including the ongoing U.S. energy renaissance. That’s news we never get tired of hearing.

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100-days  air-pollution  air-quality  economic-impacts  job-growth  ozone-standards  regulations  wyoming 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 21, 2017

We’ve argued before that more restrictive ozone standards imposed by EPA in late 2015 were unnecessary, because ambient ozone levels were declining under the 2008 standards.

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emission-reductions  air-quality  carbon-dioxide  methane  epa34 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 16, 2017

There’s a lot of good news to be found in EPA’s draft Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2015, which came out this week – all of it underscoring progress, much of it led by industry, in reducing emissions – even as American consumers and the U.S. economy are supplied the energy they need.

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vote4energy  public-health  air-quality  emission-reductions  natural-gas  infrastructure 

Kate Wallace

Kate Wallace
Posted August 23, 2016

The National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) released a new paper discussing the role of natural gas in public health throughout Turkey. The study focused on the relationship between the adoption of natural gas services and the mortality rates of adults and the elderly. Furthermore, the NBER released a study in February that focused on the relationship between the use of natural gas and infant mortality rates in Turkey.

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vote4energy  regulation  natural-gas  access  air-quality 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 21, 2016

Reducing government regulation found its way into a number of the speeches at the Republican Convention in Cleveland, and this is especially important to the future of America’s energy renaissance.

Along with cutting government red tape in leasing and permitting of energy projects, establishing a common-sense approach to energy regulation will help encourage the private investment and innovation that are driving the surge in domestic oil and natural gas production.

More on that below. First, remember that as the U.S. continues to lead the world in oil and gas production, we’ve seen economic benefits, cost savings for consumers, lower crude oil imports that have helped make America more energy secure and carbon emissions reductions that lead the globe.

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ozone  regulation  epa34  economic-impacts  air-quality 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted June 15, 2016

To comply with standards approaching or below naturally occurring levels of ozone, states could be required to restrict everything from manufacturing and energy development to infrastructure projects like roads and bridges. Even if job growth were strong, saddling states with unachievable requirements would be questionable policy at best. In an economy still struggling to add jobs, new ozone regulations that impact such a wide range of job creators – and promise little to no public health benefit – make no sense.

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air-quality  fuels  environmental-expenditures  investments  gasoline  diesel  technology-innovation  refineries 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 5, 2015

To a large degree, cleaner air in the United States results from innovations and improvements in transportation fuels over the past four decades. This is important, because the freedom to travel has been ingrained in the American psyche since the days when waves of westward migration began spanning the continent.

Today, Americans are used to free and independent movement, with the average person traveling more than 13,600 miles a year, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation. Meanwhile, Americans’ modern lifestyles depend on freight haulers that deliver commercial goods to the places where they live. The 4 million miles of highways and roads that make up a large portion of the U.S. transportation network serve as the country’s arterial system – and energy makes it go. Refineries supply more than 130 billion gallons of gasoline and 60 billion gallons of diesel a year to power trucks, barges, ships and trains connecting consumers with consumable goods.

The oil and natural gas industry is meeting the challenge of fueling America’s transportation needs while advancing air quality goals that benefit all Americans – by investing in cleaner, safer fuels and next-generation technologies for the future.

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safe-operations  safety-standards  methane  hydraulic-fracturing  epa34  air-quality 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 12, 2015

Methane emissions from oil and natural gas systems continue falling. EPA, in an update to its Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program, says that methane emissions decreased from 77 million metric tons CO2 equivalent 2013 to 73 million metric tons CO2e last year. This continues a significant downward trend over the past few years.

The significance is this: Further reductions in methane emissions argue strongly against EPA’s position that additional regulation is needed. And, indeed, the agency is working on new layers of methane regulation.

Let’s think this one through. Methane emissions are falling under current the current regulatory regime, yet EPA and its supporters say that further reductions won’t happen without more regulation. (If you feel like you’ve heard this argument before it’s because you have – see here and here on EPA’s ozone proposals.) But here’s what we know: Methane emissions associated with oil and natural gas systems are falling – at a time when natural gas production is dramatically increasing.  

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ozone  regulation  epa34  air-quality  economic-impacts  jobs 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 2, 2015

A number of Americans may look at some of the mixed reaction to the Obama administration’s release of new, more restrictive ozone standards and conclude that if industry and business groups and environmental activists all are unhappy with the final standards, then the administration must be congratulated for splitting the difference.

As measured as that sounds, it’s simply the wrong approach for setting air quality policy – and lots of Americans are likely to be caught up in the impacts.

As noted in this post, changing national ozone standards from the current 75 parts per billion (ppb) to 70 ppb could impact job growth in nearly one-third of the country’s counties or county equivalents, according to an API analysis of EPA data. Instead of 217 counties out of compliance with ozone standards, 958 could be in violation and potentially subject to constraints that could affect business expansion, infrastructure development, transportation projects and other activities in those localities. Shorter: These impacts could be coming to a neighborhood near you – affecting economic growth and job creation.

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