The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

emission-reductions  epa34  methane  natural-gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 11, 2017

We expect that, after all the data and emissions trends are considered, EPA will develop a science-based, cost-effective path to target emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), in which methane emissions reductions also are achieved. Industry supports environmental protection and, indeed, is demonstrating that support by taking actions to reduce methane emissions.

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emission-reductions  air-quality  carbon-dioxide  methane  epa34 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 16, 2017

There’s a lot of good news to be found in EPA’s draft Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2015, which came out this week – all of it underscoring progress, much of it led by industry, in reducing emissions – even as American consumers and the U.S. economy are supplied the energy they need.

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oil-and-natural-gas  economic-growth  access  regulation  epa34  renewable-fuel-standard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 13, 2017

As the Trump administration comes into office and the new Congress begins work, a sea-change is needed in the way Washington approaches American oil and natural gas abundance. It’s critically important for consumers, the U.S. economy and our country’s security. We need policies that embrace and harness America’s energy renaissance instead of trying to restrain it. We need an approach to regulation that manages safe and responsible energy development instead of smothering it in short-sighted, often unnecessary restrictions and red tape. 

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hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  safety-standards  epa34  water 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 9, 2016

With EPA’s finalize report expected any day now, Americans should ask what scientific evidence has EPA accumulated since August that would compel the agency to drop or water down its conclusion. The answer is simple: None. The science and the data led to the conclusion in EPA’s 2015 draft report. The agency should stand by it. Any other outcome would be bowing to political arguments, not scientific ones.

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hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  safety-standards  epa34  oil-and-natural-gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 17, 2016

As EPA nears the release of its finalized hydraulic fracturing/water report, the weight of scientific study and analysis backs the agency’s preliminary conclusion that there’s no evidence that fracking has led to “widespread, systemic impacts on drinking water resources in the United States.” Dozens of other recent studies reached similar conclusions – including peer-reviewed case studies and research by academics, government and industry, as well as state and federal regulatory reviews.

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natural-gas  emission-reductions  epa34  climate 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 2, 2016

Abundant, affordable and reliable. Natural gas appears in each of PJM’s compliance scenarios for good, market-based reasons – with ample availability and dependability driving its economic benefits. In the marketplace, this is a winning hand for America. 

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epa34  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  oil-and-natural-gas  safe-operations 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 12, 2016

As an agency that fundamentally bases its work on fact and scientific analysis, EPA needs to follow the facts and the science on the safety of hydraulic fracturing.

More than a year ago, after a five-year, multi-million dollar study on the impacts of fracking on drinking water resources, EPA concluded: “We did not find evidence that these mechanisms have led to widespread, systemic impacts on drinking water resources in the United States.” The report affirms volumes of scientific data, including more than 950 sources of information, technical reports, information from stakeholders and peer-reviewed EPA scientific reports.

A move by the agency’s Science Advisory Board (SAB), questioning the draft report’s conclusion, is without basis, because EPA’s work and its findings were and are scientifically sound.

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natural-gas  emissions  epa34  carbon-dioxide  regulation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 3, 2016

Some context for legal challenges to EPA’s final rule for new oil and natural gas sources, filed individually this week by a coalition of states, API and other organizations.

As we’ve noted before, methane emissions from field production of natural gas are falling – mainly because industry wants to capture as much of the primary component of natural gas as possible, to deliver to customers. Industry is on it, deploying technologies and know-how to prevent emissions during production. Bottom line: In a period of soaring production, we’ve had falling methane emissions.

This is happening under the current regulatory regime.

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renewable-fuel-standard  rfs34  consumers  ethanol  epa34  blend-wall 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 27, 2016

Two more results from the new Harris Poll on what Americans are thinking about key energy issues.

First, 77 percent of registered voters say they’re concerned about government requirements that would increase the amount of ethanol in gasoline. Second, 73 percent agree that federal government regulations could contribute to increased costs for gasoline to consumers.

Both results basically point fingers at the federal Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) – which indeed is Washington pushing for more ethanol in gasoline, which experts and studies warn could impact consumers at the gasoline pump and at the repair shop.

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ozone  regulation  epa34  economic-impacts  air-quality 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted June 15, 2016

To comply with standards approaching or below naturally occurring levels of ozone, states could be required to restrict everything from manufacturing and energy development to infrastructure projects like roads and bridges. Even if job growth were strong, saddling states with unachievable requirements would be questionable policy at best. In an economy still struggling to add jobs, new ozone regulations that impact such a wide range of job creators – and promise little to no public health benefit – make no sense.

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