The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

lng34  exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 12, 2017

The export of U.S. liquefied natural gas (LNG) continues to yield economic and other benefits locally, regionally and to our country as a whole. Two recent news items illustrate – a report detailing the boost LNG exports is giving the Texas economy, and an agreement by Poland to buy American LNG, further expanding opportunities for a valuable U.S. commodity.

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energy-exports  liquefied-natural-gas  lng34  trade 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 30, 2016

Perhaps more importantly, the November natural gas export/import numbers suggest new U.S. muscularity in the global energy marketplace, built by America’s domestic energy renaissance. Record natural gas output, largely developed with advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, is creating export opportunities for U.S. liquefied natural gas (LNG) and increasing U.S. energy influence globally.

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analysis  crude-oil  gasoline-prices  energy-exports  lng34  jack-gerard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 4, 2015

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports that the average retail price for regular gasoline on Aug. 31 was $2.51 per gallon – the lowest price for the Monday before Labor Day since 2004 and 95 cents lower than the Monday before Labor Day last year. EIA explains:

Declines in crude oil prices are the main driver behind falling U.S. gasoline prices. Lower crude oil prices reflect concerns about economic growth in emerging markets, expectations of higher oil exports from Iran, and continuing actual and expected growth in global crude oil inventories.

Certainly, the global markets for a variety of commodities may be influenced by concerns, feelings and inklings of one kind or another. Let’s focus on the tangible reason EIA cites for lower global crude prices – hence, lower prices at U.S. pumps: growth in global crude oil inventories. That refers to production and supply to the market. The story behind that story is that over the past six or seven years, the United States has led the world’s top suppliers of petroleum and other liquids in production and rate of production growth.

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analysis  pennsylvania  crude-oil  exports  lng34  liquefied-natural-gas  gasoline-prices 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted September 4, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Pennsylvania. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and began this week with reviews of LouisianaRhode IslandNevada and New York. Information for all 50 states can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States.

As we can see with Pennsylvania, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  wyoming  crude-oil-exports  economy-and-energy  gasoline-prices  income  lng34  pricewaterhousecoopers  trade  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 28, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Wyoming. We started the series with Virginia and Colorado earlier this summer and reviewed Kentucky, Tennessee , Utah and Georgia to begin this week. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Wyoming, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  utah  crude-oil-exports  economy-and-energy  gasoline-prices  income  lng34  pricewaterhousecoopers  trade  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 26, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Utah. We started the series with Virginia and Colorado earlier this summer and reviewed Kentucky and Tennessee to begin this week. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Utah, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  new-hampshire  crude-oil-exports  economy-and-energy  income  lng34  pricewaterhousecoopers  revenue  trade  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 21, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with New Hampshire. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and reviewed Hawaii, Idaho , Vermont and Oklahoma to begin this week. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with New Hampshire, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  energy-exports  trade  crude-oil  liquefied-natural-gas  lng34  economic-growth  oil-and-natural-gas-production  american-petroleum-institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 11, 2015

The U.S. Commerce Department’s recent mid-year trade report illustrates how surging domestic oil and natural gas production is helping our economy – and strongly suggests what increased domestic output could do if U.S. crude oil and liquefied natural gas (LNG) had unhindered access to global markets.

According to Commerce, the U.S. trade deficit among petroleum and petroleum products fell 56.1 percent the first six months of this year compared to the first six months of 2014 (exhibit 9). That growth helped hold the total U.S. year-over-year trade balance steady, even as the trade deficit in non-petroleum products increased 23.1 percent. API Chief Economist John Felmy:

“Despite a very competitive global market, the U.S. energy revolution continues to push our trade balance in a positive direction. Oil imports remain on the decline, and strong exports of petroleum and refined products are creating new opportunities for America to bring wealth and jobs back to U.S. shores.”

For that trend to continue, though, the United States must pursue energy trading opportunities with the same vigor it pursues trade in other areas. A 1970s-era ban on crude oil exports should be lifted, and LNG export projects should be approved by the government so that domestic producers have every chance to access global markets.

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analysis  montana  crude-oil-exports  energy  gasoline-prices  income  lng34  pricewaterhousecoopers  wood-mackenzie  trade 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 10, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Montana. We started our focus on the state level with Virginia on June 29. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Montana, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  maryland  crude-oil-exports  income  energy  gasoline-prices  lng34  pricewaterhousecoopers  trade  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 5, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Maryland. We started this week with Florida and Kansas; the series began on June 29 with Virginia. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Maryland, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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