The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

100-days  air-pollution  air-quality  economic-impacts  job-growth  ozone-standards  regulations  wyoming 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 21, 2017

We’ve argued before that more restrictive ozone standards imposed by EPA in late 2015 were unnecessary, because ambient ozone levels were declining under the 2008 standards.

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analysis  arkansas  ozone-standards 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted September 8, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Arkansas. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and all information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Arkansas, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  new-york  ozone-regulations  ozone-standards 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted September 3, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with New York. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and began this week with reviews of LouisianaRhode Island and Nevada. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with New York, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy's national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  nevada  economy  ozone-standards 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted September 2, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Nevada. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and began this week with a review of Louisiana and Rhode Island. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Nevada, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  ozone-standards  epa34  economic-impacts  air-quality  american-petroleum-institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 28, 2015

We’ve written quite a bit recently about EPA’s proposal to impose stricter ozone standards on the U.S. (see here, here and here) – and the reason is there’s so much at stake.

If implemented, the stricter ozone standards could be the costliest regulation ever, potentially reducing U.S. GDP by $270 billion per year and $3.4 trillion from 2017 to 2040, according to a study by NERA Economic Consulting for the National Association of Manufacturers. The U.S. could see 2.9 million fewer jobs or job equivalents per year on average through 2040.

Yeah, that’s big.

Certainly, for those kinds of impacts Americans would expect them to be justified. But EPA’s proposal is starkly lacking in terms of the science and public health.

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analysis  ozone-standards  epa34  regulation  air-quality  science  economic-impacts  american-petroleum-institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 27, 2015

With national ozone levels falling, some activists argue for stricter federal standards the best way they can – by pointing to the relatively few areas in the United States where ozone levels remain above the current standard of 75 parts per billion (ppb).

Yet, think about that. If an urban area like Los Angeles or Houston currently is out of attainment with the standard set at 75 ppb, how will lowering the national standard to 65 or 60 ppb – which EPA is considering – make a difference in those and other non-compliant areas? Good question.

The fact remains that the current standards are working. EPA data shows ozone levels declined 18 percent between 2008 and 2013.

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analysis  ozone-standards  economic-impacts  american-petroleum-institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 14, 2015

Our new ad lays out key facts about EPA’s move to tighten U.S. ozone standards. Howard Feldman, API’s senior director of regulatory and scientific affairs, talked about the messages in a new multimedia advertising campaign – that stricter ozone standards aren’t necessary because existing standards are making the air cleaner and effectively protecting public health – during a conference call with reporters. Chief points:

Ozone levels are down – Our air is cleaner and continues to get cleaner under 2008 ozone standards – and those aren’t even fully implemented yet. EPA data shows ground-level ozone in the U.S. dropped 18 percent between 2000 and 2013.

“Air quality will continue to improve as we implement the existing standards. Further tightening of the standards wouldn’t necessarily improve air quality any faster, but it could significantly impact U.S. jobs and the economy. … A lower standard could, for little or no health benefit, significantly constrain our nation’s economy and eliminate thousands of jobs.”

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news  energy-exports  crude-oil  liquefied-natural-gas  pipelines  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  ozone-standards  canadian-oil-sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 27, 2015

Wall Street Journal op-ed (John Hess): While one can debate the reasons for the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries’ decision in November to continue flooding the oil markets, the fact is that this is squeezing many U.S. shale oil producers out of business. Oil prices have dropped by 50% in the past six months, and crude oil inventories in the U.S. have grown from 350 million barrels last year to more than 480 million barrels today.

Part of the reason inventory has ballooned is that crude produced in the U.S. is literally trapped here, because American firms are not allowed to sell it overseas. An antiquated rule bans crude oil exports from the lower 48 American states, even though producers could earn $5-$14 more per barrel by selling on the world market. At this moment the U.S. government is considering lifting sanctions on Iranian crude oil exports. Why not lift the self-imposed “sanctions” on U.S. crude exports that have been in place for the past four decades?

The export ban is a relic of a previous era, put in place around the time of the 1973 Arab oil embargo against the U.S., when Washington thought very differently about ensuring America’s energy needs. Other measures related to the 1973 embargo, such as price controls and rationing, were eliminated decades ago, as policy makers realized that they impeded, rather than aided, American energy security. But the ban on crude oil exports persists.

There is no defensible justification for the continued ban on the export of U.S. crude oil.

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jack-gerard  cera  infrastructure  keystone-xl-pipeline  oil-and-gas-industry  ozone-standards  renewable-fuel-standard  regulations 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 23, 2015

In a post earlier this month I suggested that the domestic energy surge – the government says the U.S. is No. 1 in the world in energy developed from oil and natural gas – is helping reduce oil imports and increasing U.S. energy security – and that it’s a big reason fewer than one in four Americans recently told Gallup they view the energy situation as “very serious.” Probably safe to say the other three are more or less comfortable with the country’s energy picture.  

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ozone-standards  epa34  economic-impacts  american-petroleum-institute  regulation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 17, 2015

The job that could be lost could be yours, or the job that doesn’t materialize could be the one you had your heart set on. Both scenarios could result from lower federal standards on ground-level ozone, which EPA has proposed and is expected to finalize later this year.

A NERA Economic Consulting study lays out the big-picture impacts, that a stricter ozone regulation could reduce U.S. GDP by $270 billion per year and $3.4 trillion from 2017 to 2040, resulting in 2.9 million fewer jobs or job equivalents per year on average through 2040.

Big numbers, but abstract. Embedded in them are potential real-world impacts for lots of Americans in terms of economic opportunity lost or denied, illustrated here on a state-by-state basis. These include businesses that might not be launched or expanded, infrastructure plans that could be shelved, such as roads and bridges. It could entail activities that communities might restrict as they try to comply with stricter ozone standards.

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