The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

100-days  air-pollution  air-quality  economic-impacts  job-growth  ozone-standards  regulations  wyoming 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 21, 2017

We’ve argued before that more restrictive ozone standards imposed by EPA in late 2015 were unnecessary, because ambient ozone levels were declining under the 2008 standards.

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hydraulic-fracturing  ghg-emission-reduction  regulations  drinking-water  energy-production  horizontal-drilling  carbon-emissions 

Erik Milito

Erik Milito
Posted June 9, 2016

Competitive forces and industry innovation continue to drive technological advances and produce clean-burning natural gas, which has led to reducing carbon emissions from power generation to their lowest level in more than 20 years, making it clear that environmental progress and energy production are not mutually exclusive.

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analysis  alaska  arctic  beaufort-sea  chukchi-sea  income  oil-and-natural-gas  pricewaterhousecoopers  regulations  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 30, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Alaska. We started the week with a look at North Dakota. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Alaska, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  california  crude-oil-exports  energy-development  income  oil-and-natural-gas-development  regulations  pricewaterhousecoopers  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 10, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with California. We started our focus on the state level with Virginia on June 29 and continued this week with Missouri, Indiana, North Carolina and West Virginia. The energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

Information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information will be populated on this map as the series continues. 

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analysis  north-carolina  atlantic-ocs  income  oil-and-natural-gas-development  regulations  wood-mackenzie  pricewaterhousecoopers 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 8, 2015

Today’s post continues our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states. We started the series with Virginia. Yesterday we reviewed the benefits in Indiana. Today: North Carolina. The energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  colorado  energy  income  oil-and-natural-gas-development  regulations  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 1, 2015

The energy choices we make in every state individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added. As we continue our state series focusing on how energy impacts each of the 50 states, today’s data comes from Colorado.

The top-line numbers: 213,100 jobs supported statewide, according to PwC; $25 billion added to the state economy and $14.1 billion contributed to the state’s labor income. All are significant drivers for the state’s economy.

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analysis  energy  development  oil-and-natural-gas-industry  revenues  regulations  taxes  revenue  wood-mackenzie  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 30, 2015

Wood Mackenzie’s study comparing the effects of pro-development energy policies with those of regulatory-constrained energy policies is really not much of a comparison at all. Pro-development policies would boost U.S. domestic energy supplies and job creation while benefiting American households, the study found. Pro-development policies also would add to economic growth and generate increased revenues for government. Let’s look at those today.

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analysis  ohio  income  oil-and-natural-gas-development  regulations  energy  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted June 30, 2015

Yesterday we launched a series of posts that, over the next few weeks, will highlight the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states. The energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

We started with Virginia. Today: Ohio.

The top-line numbers: 255,100 jobs supported statewide, according to PwC; $28.4 billion added to Ohio’s economy; $12.7 billion contributed to the state’s labor income and nearly 14,000 shale-related business establishments supported across Ohio. All are significant drivers for the state’s economy.

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analysis  virginia  income  oil-and-natural-gas-development  regulations  energy  wood-mackenzie  pricewaterhousecoopers 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted June 29, 2015

Here on the blog we regularly point to the national economic and job impacts of energy development: 9.8 million jobs supported, and $1.2 trillion in value added to the economy – accounting for 8 percent of our national GDP. Over the next few weeks we want to bring the focus to the state level, highlighting those impacts in each of the 50 states. We’ll start with … Virginia.

The top-line numbers: more than 141,000 jobs supported statewide, according to PwC ; $12.5 billion added to the state economy; $7.2 billion contributed to the state’s labor income. All are significant drivers for the state’s economy.

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news  regulations  permit-delays  infrastructure  oil-and-natural-gas-development  liquefied-natural-gas  energy-exports  refineries  epa34  ethanol  shale-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 27, 2015

Wall Street Journal commentary (Engler and McGarvey): America’s business and labor leaders agree: President Obama and Congress can do more to modernize the permitting process for infrastructure projects—airports, factories, power plants and pipelines—which at the moment is burdensome, slow and inconsistent.

Gaining approval to build a new bridge or factory typically involves review by multiple federal agencies—such as the Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Forest Service, the Interior Department, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Land Management—with overlapping jurisdictions and no real deadlines. Often, no single federal entity is responsible for managing the process. Even after a project is granted permits, lawsuits can hold things up for years—or, worse, halt a half-completed construction project.

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