The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

renewable-fuel-standard  rfs34  consumers  fuels 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted August 17, 2018

With EPA receiving public input this week on its proposed ethanol volumes for 2019 under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), it’s important to stay focused on the potential negative impacts of a broken Washington policy — on consumers and the fuel market.

Yes, we know that America’s energy renaissance in natural gas and oil production has accomplished the program’s aim of reducing U.S. reliance on imported crude oil. And we know that the RFS’ original goal of developing a commercially viable supply of cellulosic biofuel hasn’t become a reality. Even putting those (very large) factors aside, it is still very clear that lawmakers must to work together to find meaningful and long-term solutions to the broken RFS mandate – because it could bring very real harm to the nation’s consumers through higher energy costs and damage to the engines in their vehicles.

This week, API Downstream Group Director Frank Macchiarola told reporters that Congress needs to protect American consumers from potential risks posed by RFS mandates.

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e10-blend-wall  epa34  rfs34  ethanol 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted July 18, 2018

In the decade since the inception of the RFS, EPA has consistently implemented the mandate in a manner that dictates more and more ethanol into a fuels market regardless of whether market conditions can bear such an increase.  The ever-increasing volumes of ethanol in the fuel supply – more than can be used in E10 gasoline - inefficiently pushes fuels such as E15 into the marketplace. This puts consumers at risk because three out of four vehicles in the U.S. fleet were not built to use E15, including some model year 2018 cars and trucks from BMW, Mazda, Mercedes, Mitsubishi, Subaru and Volvo, among others. A number of automakers have said that using E15 could potentially void car warranties. Moreover, E15 is not compatible with motorcycles, boats, lawn equipment and ATVs. 

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rfs34  e1534 

Sabrina Fang

Sabrina Fang
Posted June 7, 2018

Recognizing the harm E15 can impose on consumers, Senator Tom Udall and Rep. Peter Welch issued a letter to EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt reiterating of the EPA’s lack of legal authority to allow the sale of E15 gasoline without the necessary legislation:

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renewable-fuel-standard  rfs34  ethanol  epa34  e1534 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 30, 2017

EPA is out with ethanol use requirements for 2018 under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), and the big takeaway is that a broken program remains in place – its original purpose superseded by surging domestic oil production and U.S. consumers still at risk. 

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renewable-fuel-standard  rfs34  consumers  ethanol 

Sabrina Fang

Sabrina Fang
Posted November 10, 2017

On Nov. 30, EPA is scheduled to finalize 2018 ethanol volumes for the U.S. fuel supply under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). Yet, the RFS remains a broken program that’s also outdated, its original purposes overtaken by the U.S. energy renaissance. This week, API Downstream Group Director Frank Macchiarola told reporters that Congress needs to protect American consumers from potential risks posed by RFS mandates.

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renewable-fuel-standard  rfs34  consumers  ethanol  e1534 

Sabrina Fang

Sabrina Fang
Posted June 13, 2017

This week members of the U.S. Senate will consider legislation that would serve to expand the presence of E15 fuel in the marketplace. Unfortunately, the bill is a distraction from fundamental problems with the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), which is forcing more and more ethanol into the nation’s fuel supply. Research has shown higher ethanol blends, such as E15, could damage vehicle engines and fuel pump systems, socking consumers with the repair bills. The RFS needs to be repealed or significantly reformed, to protect U.S. consumers. As EPA prepares to announce ethanol mandates for 2018 under the RFS, API Downstream Group Director Frank Macchiarola briefed reporters on the flawed program.

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renewable-fuel-standard  rfs34  consumers  e1534  ethanol  blend-wall 

Sabrina Fang

Sabrina Fang
Posted April 7, 2017

A new national API poll shows that American voters have serious concerns about the Renewable Fuel Standard and its mandates for ever-increasing levels of ethanol in the nation’s fuel supply. Key findings from the survey of 1,000 registered voters include 74 percent agreeing that federal regulations could contribute to increased costs for gasoline to consumers and 68 percent who're concerned about government regulations that would increase the amount of ethanol in gasoline.

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rfs34  policy 

Sabrina Fang

Sabrina Fang
Posted February 23, 2017

The recent push to shift responsibility for compliance with the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), from refiners and importers to independent blenders and retail gasoline stations, is a flawed approach that could impact consumers at the gasoline pump and does nothing to fix the larger set of problems that plague the RFS – problems Congress must address by repealing the program or significantly reforming it. API Downstream Group Director Frank Macchiarola discussed these issues during a conference call with reporters.

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100-days  renewable-fuel-standard  rfs34  consumers  ethanol 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 21, 2017

There might not be a sharper contrast with the innovation- and market-driven success of the U.S. energy renaissance than the flawed federal Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) – a program rooted in the era of U.S. energy scarcity that has been mostly closed by the ongoing surge in domestic oil and natural gas production.

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renewable-fuel-standard  rfs34  consumers  ethanol 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 16, 2017

Changing the point of obligation under the federal Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) – moving it closer to U.S. consumers – continues to distract from the real problems with the RFS that Congress should address, either by repealing or significantly reforming the program. Meanwhile, with a public commenting period on the proposal ending next week, a number of groups caution that the change could result in motorists paying more for gasoline.

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