The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

minnesota  oil-and-natural-gas  refineries  vote4energy  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 17, 2016

Minnesota produces no oil or natural gas itself, yet important energy infrastructure – a couple of crude oil refineries and a number of pipeline systems make it integral to U.S. energy. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the Pine Bend Refinery (339,000 barrels per day) is the largest refinery located in a non-oil producing state. Much of the crude processed by both refineries comes from Canada, America’s largest source of imported oil (1.15 billion barrels in 2015) and critically important to U.S. energy security.

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kansas  oil-and-natural-gas  refineries  infrastructure  states2016  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 2, 2016

The varied energy story in Kansas includes oil and natural gas production, refining, critically important pipeline infrastructure and significant contributions from renewables, chiefly wind. In other words, Kansas – while not one of the country’s top energy producers – has an integral role in the overall U.S. energy picture. 

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indiana  vote4energy  natural-gas  refineries  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 22, 2016

Indiana’s significant industrial sector, which manufactures steel, aluminum, chemicals and more, used more energy (1,327 trillion Btu) than the state’s residential and commercial sectors combined (972.8 trillion Btu) in 2014. The sector is the state’s largest natural gas user, consuming more gas than all other sectors combined, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

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delaware  vote4energy  refineries  infrastructure  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 16, 2016

The fact that Delaware has no oil or natural gas production doesn’t diminish the important part the state plays in America’s overall energy sector. Delaware is home to the Delaware City coking refinery, one of two coking refineries on the East Coast. These supply petroleum coke for the electric power and industrial sectors and makes up about a fifth of the nation’s finished petroleum product exports, according to U.S. Energy Information Administration data. In addition to that energy infrastructure, the state’s Delaware River ports and rail network make it critically important to the shipment of crude oil for refining in the state and neighboring states.

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vote4energy  louisiana  energy-production  refineries  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 9, 2016

We kicked off our 50 states of energy blog post series on Monday with New Jersey. Over the next several weeks we’ll focus on the impacts of energy in each individual state – underscoring the reality that the United States as an energy superpower, leading the world in oil and natural gas production, is very much a sum of its energy parts. Today: Louisiana.

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infrastructure  transportation  refineries  petroleum-products 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 19, 2016

The United States has about 25,000 miles of navigable waterways and channels – vital transportation infrastructure for the delivery of raw materials and products that American consumers count on every day. Yet, as vital as these waterways are, they don’t always get as much attention as highways, roads and railroads.

With Congress likely to take up legislation that will include funding for waterways in the next month or so, it’s a good time to link that debate with the critical role water-borne commerce plays.


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air-quality  fuels  environmental-expenditures  investments  gasoline  diesel  technology-innovation  refineries 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 5, 2015

To a large degree, cleaner air in the United States results from innovations and improvements in transportation fuels over the past four decades. This is important, because the freedom to travel has been ingrained in the American psyche since the days when waves of westward migration began spanning the continent.

Today, Americans are used to free and independent movement, with the average person traveling more than 13,600 miles a year, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation. Meanwhile, Americans’ modern lifestyles depend on freight haulers that deliver commercial goods to the places where they live. The 4 million miles of highways and roads that make up a large portion of the U.S. transportation network serve as the country’s arterial system – and energy makes it go. Refineries supply more than 130 billion gallons of gasoline and 60 billion gallons of diesel a year to power trucks, barges, ships and trains connecting consumers with consumable goods.

The oil and natural gas industry is meeting the challenge of fueling America’s transportation needs while advancing air quality goals that benefit all Americans – by investing in cleaner, safer fuels and next-generation technologies for the future.

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analysis  energy-exports  crude-oil  mexico  economic-benefits  refineries 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 31, 2015

More about last week’s Commerce Department decision to allow U.S. crude oil swaps with Mexico – basically, a positive step in the direction of lifting America’s 1970s-era ban on exporting domestic crude.

An analysis by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) says the exchange of light U.S. oil for heavier Mexican oil will generate economic and environmental benefits. The economic piece certainly is consistent with a number of studies that say lifting the ban and exporting domestic crude will generate broad benefits for our economy and savings at the pump for U.S. consumers, while spurring domestic production.

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analysis  renewable-fuel-standard  epa34  ethanol  blend-wall  e8534  refineries 

Bob Greco

Bob Greco
Posted June 26, 2015

API Downstream Group Director Bob Greco traveled this week to EPA’s field hearing on the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) in Kansas City, to detail concerns over the flawed program, with its market-distorting mandates for ever-increasing use of ethanol in the national fuel supply. His remarks, as prepared for delivery:

The Ethanol Blend Wall

Our members’ primary RFS concern is the ethanol blend wall.  Serious vehicle and retail infrastructure compatibility issues exist with gasoline containing more than 10 percent ethanol.  We are encouraged that EPA has proposed to address this reality. 

Gasoline demand increases projected in 2007 did not materialize, and Congress granted EPA the authority to balance its aspirational goals with reality. API supports EPA’s use of its explicit RFS waiver authorities in 2014, ‘15, ‘16, and beyond to avoid negative impacts on America’s fuel supply and to prevent harm to American consumers. 

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analysis  hurricane-preparedness  refineries  oil-and-natural-gas-industry  infrastructure  offshore-operations 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 9, 2015

With another hurricane season upon us, it’s timely to briefly review the ways the oil and natural gas industry is prepared for conditions that could impact industry operations, particularly in the Gulf Coast region and Gulf of Mexico – home to more than 45 percent of U.S. refining capacity and about 17 percent of the nation’s oil and 5 percent of its natural gas production.

While the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is predicting below-normal activity in the Atlantic region (which includes the Gulf), industry still takes a number precautions and has response plans in place in the event of a serious storm – wise, considering the potential impacts to facilities, regional and national economies and the environment.

You can read about this in detail in this hurricane fact sheet.

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