The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

massachusetts  infrastructure  natural-gas-pipelines  states2016  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 3, 2016

The key energy issue in Massachusetts, like a number of other New England states, is infrastructure. Massachusetts doesn’t produce natural gas and oil itself, so the state must bring these fuels in from elsewhere to heat homes and generate electricity for residences and businesses.

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kansas  oil-and-natural-gas  refineries  infrastructure  states2016  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 2, 2016

The varied energy story in Kansas includes oil and natural gas production, refining, critically important pipeline infrastructure and significant contributions from renewables, chiefly wind. In other words, Kansas – while not one of the country’s top energy producers – has an integral role in the overall U.S. energy picture. 

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vote4energy  connecticut  infrastructure  natural-gas  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 24, 2016

Connecticut produces neither crude oil nor natural gas. It relies on intrastate pipelines to deliver natural gas, which is the leading fuel used by state residents and businesses. Sufficient pipeline capacity is the critical energy issue in Connecticut and the rest of New England, and that depends on operators having the opportunity to build new pipelines.

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vote4energy  public-health  air-quality  emission-reductions  natural-gas  infrastructure 

Kate Wallace

Kate Wallace
Posted August 23, 2016

The National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) released a new paper discussing the role of natural gas in public health throughout Turkey. The study focused on the relationship between the adoption of natural gas services and the mortality rates of adults and the elderly. Furthermore, the NBER released a study in February that focused on the relationship between the use of natural gas and infant mortality rates in Turkey.

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rhode-island  vote4energy  natural-gas  infrastructure  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 19, 2016

Without any oil or natural gas of its own, Rhode Island ranks 49th among the 50 states in energy production. Thus, virtually all of the energy Rhode Island uses must come from somewhere else. In 2015, 95.2 percent of Rhode Island’s net generation of electricity was fueled by natural gas, which makes sufficient infrastructure – pipelines and gas-fired power plants – an imperative. 

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delaware  vote4energy  refineries  infrastructure  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 16, 2016

The fact that Delaware has no oil or natural gas production doesn’t diminish the important part the state plays in America’s overall energy sector. Delaware is home to the Delaware City coking refinery, one of two coking refineries on the East Coast. These supply petroleum coke for the electric power and industrial sectors and makes up about a fifth of the nation’s finished petroleum product exports, according to U.S. Energy Information Administration data. In addition to that energy infrastructure, the state’s Delaware River ports and rail network make it critically important to the shipment of crude oil for refining in the state and neighboring states.

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liquefied-natural-gas  lng-exports  trade  us-energy-security  fracking  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 2, 2016

Gaining strength is the argument that the United States should move as expeditiously as possible on liquefied natural gas (LNG) export infrastructure that would help secure America’s place in the emerging global LNG market.

The added heft is seen in two ways. First, the initial U.S. shipment of LNG passed through the newly expanded Panama Canal last week, underscoring a point made in this postthat the widened canal will shorten voyage times from U.S. LNG export facilities on the Gulf Coast to Asia and the western coast of South America, boosting the competitiveness of U.S. suppliers. Reduced voyage time means quicker turnaround times, leading to better service and a boost to U.S. competitiveness.

Secondly, an International Energy Agency (IEA) report projects the U.S. will become the world’s third-largest LNG supplier in five years, behind Qatar and Australia. 

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natural-gas  electricity  economic-benefits  infrastructure  fracking  pipelines 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 14, 2016

CNBC has put out its annual ranking of America’s top states for business, an analysis based on a number of things including metrics for workforce, infrastructure, access to capital and quality of life. Another of those metrics, cost of living, caught our eye because energy was part of the calculation. Indeed, in CNBC’s ranking of the country’s 10 most expensive states to live in, the cost of energy to residents a key factor.

Five members of that dubious top 10 are New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Hampshire, and energy costs there are higher than they need to be. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), those states and neighbors Maine and Vermont all had costs for residential electricity and natural gas that exceeded national averages this past winter. Of course, these states are located in a part of the country where more energy infrastructure (see previous posts here and here) could positively impact energy costs.  

A couple of charts show the cost being borne by consumers in those states, in part, because there’s inadequate natural gas pipeline infrastructure to meet home heating and power generation needs during peak winter months.

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pipeline-safety  natural-gas  regulation  economic-impacts  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 7, 2016

We frequently post on the potential risk to U.S. energy production and the benefits the American energy revolution is generating for the economy and individual households from the administration’s regulatory push and government red tape (see herehere and here). There might not be a better current example of the potential regulatory impact on U.S. energy than new rules for natural gas transmission and gathering lines proposed by the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA).

Consider: According to a study by ICF International, measuring the impact of PHMSA’s proposals, for 2,200 small pipeline companies across the country the annual cost of complying with the new regulations would come close to what the companies earn from gathering line fees. That’s impact – impact on small businesses and impact on energy development associated with the work those companies do.

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petroleum  president-obama  oil-and-natural-gas  us-energy-security  economic-benefits  access  fracking  infrastructure  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 6, 2016

Good to hear President Obama extolling some of the benefits of the U.S. energy revolution this week in North Carolina, starting with security and consumer benefits. Both are firmly linked to surging domestic oil production – which of course is why the United States leads the world in oil and natural gas output. The president:

“Remember when we were all concerned about our dependence on foreign oil? Well, let me tell you, we’ve cut the amount of oil we buy from other countries in half. Remember when the other team was promising they were going to get gas prices down in like 10 years? We did it. … So we have been able to shape an energy policy that’s good for families, good for your pocketbook.”

Indeed, producing more oil and gas here at home has had great impact on U.S. energy security and security overall. The United States is stronger in the world today because it is less dependent on others for imported energy. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), net imports stood at 4.6 million barrels of oil per day in 2015 – lower than any year since they were at 4.2 million barrels per day in 1985. EIA projects that in 2040 net crude imports will drop to about 1.5 million barrels per day.

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