The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

infrastructure  pipelines 

Michael Tadeo

Michael Tadeo
Posted September 19, 2016

The benefits of pipeline infrastructure are being felt in one small Belgian city. Only get this: The deliverable is beer.

The Halve Maan Brewery in Bruges recently opened a beer pipeline connecting the brewery in the center of the town to a bottling plant about 2 miles away. The $4.5 million pipeline that took five months to build can deliver 12,000 bottles of beer an hour to the bottling plant. Not only will the pipeline increase efficiency in delivering this product to market, but its multi-million dollar construction likely provided an economic boost to the area.

Read More

north-dakota  pipelines  economic-benefits  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 14, 2016

Each job is the economic lifeline for an individual and/or family, thousands of them. Sales tax revenues reflect economic activity along the construction corridor that benefits local businesses of all kinds. Property taxes typically support schools, hospitals, emergency services and other vital public services and facilities. If you’re a resident of one of the states traversed by the DAPL, the project is valuable to your community, to you and your neighbors – and the administration’s attempt to contravene the regular, lawful order puts that value at risk.

Read More

north-dakota  pipeline-construction  bakken-shale  oil-and-natural-gas  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 13, 2016

The situation in North Dakota with the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) – with various groups trying to shut down construction of a legally permitted project that’s already 60 percent finished  – is about more than a pipeline, infrastructure needs, economic growth and job creation. It’s about more than U.S. energy security, which the project will strengthen. It’s about the rule of law in this country.

Read More

massachusetts  infrastructure  natural-gas-pipelines  states2016  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 3, 2016

The key energy issue in Massachusetts, like a number of other New England states, is infrastructure. Massachusetts doesn’t produce natural gas and oil itself, so the state must bring these fuels in from elsewhere to heat homes and generate electricity for residences and businesses.

Read More

kansas  oil-and-natural-gas  refineries  infrastructure  states2016  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 2, 2016

The varied energy story in Kansas includes oil and natural gas production, refining, critically important pipeline infrastructure and significant contributions from renewables, chiefly wind. In other words, Kansas – while not one of the country’s top energy producers – has an integral role in the overall U.S. energy picture. 

Read More

vote4energy  connecticut  infrastructure  natural-gas  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 24, 2016

Connecticut produces neither crude oil nor natural gas. It relies on intrastate pipelines to deliver natural gas, which is the leading fuel used by state residents and businesses. Sufficient pipeline capacity is the critical energy issue in Connecticut and the rest of New England, and that depends on operators having the opportunity to build new pipelines.

Read More

vote4energy  public-health  air-quality  emission-reductions  natural-gas  infrastructure 

Kate Wallace

Kate Wallace
Posted August 23, 2016

The National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) released a new paper discussing the role of natural gas in public health throughout Turkey. The study focused on the relationship between the adoption of natural gas services and the mortality rates of adults and the elderly. Furthermore, the NBER released a study in February that focused on the relationship between the use of natural gas and infant mortality rates in Turkey.

Read More

rhode-island  vote4energy  natural-gas  infrastructure  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 19, 2016

Without any oil or natural gas of its own, Rhode Island ranks 49th among the 50 states in energy production. Thus, virtually all of the energy Rhode Island uses must come from somewhere else. In 2015, 95.2 percent of Rhode Island’s net generation of electricity was fueled by natural gas, which makes sufficient infrastructure – pipelines and gas-fired power plants – an imperative. 

Read More

delaware  vote4energy  refineries  infrastructure  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 16, 2016

The fact that Delaware has no oil or natural gas production doesn’t diminish the important part the state plays in America’s overall energy sector. Delaware is home to the Delaware City coking refinery, one of two coking refineries on the East Coast. These supply petroleum coke for the electric power and industrial sectors and makes up about a fifth of the nation’s finished petroleum product exports, according to U.S. Energy Information Administration data. In addition to that energy infrastructure, the state’s Delaware River ports and rail network make it critically important to the shipment of crude oil for refining in the state and neighboring states.

Read More

liquefied-natural-gas  lng-exports  trade  us-energy-security  fracking  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 2, 2016

Gaining strength is the argument that the United States should move as expeditiously as possible on liquefied natural gas (LNG) export infrastructure that would help secure America’s place in the emerging global LNG market.

The added heft is seen in two ways. First, the initial U.S. shipment of LNG passed through the newly expanded Panama Canal last week, underscoring a point made in this postthat the widened canal will shorten voyage times from U.S. LNG export facilities on the Gulf Coast to Asia and the western coast of South America, boosting the competitiveness of U.S. suppliers. Reduced voyage time means quicker turnaround times, leading to better service and a boost to U.S. competitiveness.

Secondly, an International Energy Agency (IEA) report projects the U.S. will become the world’s third-largest LNG supplier in five years, behind Qatar and Australia. 

Read More