The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

economic-impacts  jobs  oil-and-natural-gas  new-york  south-carolina  maryland 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 2, 2017

Energy-producing states and non-producers – all state economies are positively impacted by an industry that accounted for 7.6 percent of U.S. GDP in 2015. Yet, the state-level story also is about the opportunity for growth so that industry’s economic benefits have even greater impact in certain parts of the country. 

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jobs  oil-and-natural-gas  economic-impacts  gdp34 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 1, 2017

The United States leads the world in natural gas and oil production, thanks to vast energy reserves and advanced technologies, such as hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, and also the work of natural gas, oil and refining sectors that supply Americans’ daily needs and increase our security while boosting the broader economy and advancing climate goals. This economic heft is clear in a new PwC study showing that the natural gas and oil industry supported 10.3 million U.S. jobs in 2015 – up 500,000 since 2011– while adding $1.3 trillion to the national economy or about 7.6 percent of U.S. GDP. Importantly, industry’s economic lift extends to all 50 states, PwC found, energy producers and non-producers.


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renewable-fuel-standard  consumers  ethanol  blend-wall  e1534  e8534 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 1, 2017

With EPA receiving public input this week on its proposed ethanol-use volumes for 2018, it’s important to see that America’s energy renaissance in natural gas and oil production is the biggest reason for the progress the U.S. has made toward those RFS objectives. 

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states2017  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 1, 2017

Mount Washington is New England’s highest peak, rising to 6,289 feet in New Hampshire’s White Mountain National Forest, about three hours north of the state capital at Concord. The summit offers breathtaking views in all directions – on a clear day you can see the Atlantic Ocean from up there. Yet, getting there is at least as exhilarating as arriving. That’s where energy comes in.

If you’re eager, experienced and fit, you can hike all the way up in four hours or so. Some of the gear that hikers need is made with or from petroleum, which we touched on in the West Virginia chapter of this series. For a climb like Mount Washington, you need stuff that’s lightweight yet durable and water resistant. You also can drive up or be driven to the summit. Again, energy.

There’s also the Mount Washington Cog Railway.

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natural-gas  pennsylvania-severance-tax  economic-growth  consumers  jobs  marcellus-shale-region 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 28, 2017

The latest severance tax proposal in Pennsylvania, targeting natural gas production as well as consumer items and services, is a story of lawmakers risking harm to ongoing energy activity and economic growth – already providing significant benefits to people all across the commonwealth – instead of working to expand opportunity through pro-growth policies. Unfortunately, the tale being written by the state Senate could be about less natural gas production (and potentially less revenue to the commonwealth), less economic growth and fewer benefits to Pennsylvanians.

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access  federal-lands  oil-and-natural-gas  hydraullic-fracturing  blm34  permit-delays 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 28, 2017

It’s a positive step – for U.S. energy, economic growth, consumer benefits and climate progress – for the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to begin rescinding its 2015 hydraulic fracturing rule – one that we argue duplicates existing and effective state regulation and risks delaying energy development, potentially impacting consumers. The agency should follow this up by moving swiftly to improve the permitting process for natural gas and oil development on federal lands, as Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke ordered earlier this month.

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states2017  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 27, 2017

With energy, colors are brighter, they last longer and they’re easier to use. Energy also helps artists create, fueling critical key processes lots of artists use. This includes a number of them who’ll be part of the “Art in the Pearl” event, a Labor Day Weekend fine arts and crafts festival staged each year in the streets of Portland’s Pearl District.

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consumers  gasoline-prices  oil-production  crude-oil-prices 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 26, 2017

Nationally, the average price of a gallon of gasoline the third week of July was $2.392 – about 42 percent lower than the national average price at the same time in 2008, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Retail gasoline prices haven’t been “sticky,” as Sen. Charles Schumer said on ABC’s “This Week,” suggesting that some sort of anti-Adam Smith force has kept them from decreasing. Yet, as we can see, they have decreased significantly over a time period that coincides with accelerated U.S. crude oil production (thanks, fracking).

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states2017  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 25, 2017

South Carolina has South of the Border, the world’s largest ball of twine sits under a shelter in Kansas, Tennessee has Rock City and Minnesota is home to the SPAM Museum. Yet, probably none is as famous the world over as Wall Drug – relentlessly, ubiquitously, hawking “free ice water” to draw visitors to the king of kitsch for 81 years. While the town of Wall is smaller than the tip of a pen on the Rand McNally, no one else has a photo-op magnet, for youngsters and oldsters alike, that’s better than Wall Drug’s big ‘ol “Jackalope.” Behind the ice water billboards, the Jackalope and all the rest of Wall Drug’s crazy-quilt allure, there’s energy.

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refineries  refinery-capacity  consumers  petroleum-products  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 24, 2017

Over the past 40 years, U.S. capacity has increased more than 1,000 percent.  Such a remarkable increase is a tribute to industry’s commitment to supply consumer needs. … Add it all up, and these numbers are very important to American consumers. Refineries not only produce the fuels that keep our vehicles running – transportation fuels account for about 85 percent of products leaving the refinery – they also turn out the petrochemical feedstocks used in countless ways in our modern lives …

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