The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

offshore-energy  offshore-safety  offshore-technology  bsee  north-carolina  south-carolina  virginia 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 10, 2017

As the Trump administration weighs opening the Mid-Atlantic outer continental shelf to future oil and natural gas development, a number of people who work and live in coastal areas appropriately question whether offshore energy can be developed safely, without undue risks. The answer is yes.

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north-carolina  offshore-development  vote4energy  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 8, 2016

Keeping offshore energy under wraps hinders U.S. security and blocks states like North Carolina from realizing the job and economic benefits that could come with safe development. North Carolinians recognize the potential benefits for their state as well as the nation, 64 percent of registered state voters saying they support offshore development.

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analysis  north-carolina  atlantic-ocs  income  oil-and-natural-gas-development  regulations  wood-mackenzie  pricewaterhousecoopers 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 8, 2015

Today’s post continues our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states. We started the series with Virginia. Yesterday we reviewed the benefits in Indiana. Today: North Carolina. The energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  north-carolina  oil-and-natural-gas-development  economic-growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 8, 2015

David McGowan was named executive director of the North Carolina Petroleum Council in 2013. Previously, McGowan served as director of regulatory affairs for the North Carolina Association of Realtors. He is a graduate of the University of North Carolina. Below, he talks with Energy Tomorrow about the potential for energy development in North Carolina, as well as the challenges for industry in his state. 

Q: What do North Carolinians think about the state’s onshore and offshore energy potential? Is it something people are aware of, and what do you believe they want most from industry as it develops that energy?

McGowan: An overwhelming bipartisan majority of North Carolinians support more domestic exploration and production for oil and natural gas resources, both onshore and offshore. According to a Harris poll in January, 91 percent of the state’s citizens believe that we should produce more energy here at home to strengthen our energy security. Furthermore, 90 percent believe that increased oil and natural gas production will lead to more jobs here in the state. North Carolinians also understand that our country and our state need oil and gas resources for our economy to grow. They understand that more domestic production increases global supplies, putting downward pressure on costs and benefiting consumers.

Finally, most people in the state understand that energy production and environmental stewardship are not mutually exclusive. They know that we can safely and responsibly develop our natural resources, create jobs and stimulate the economy – all the while ensuring that the health of our citizens and environment are protected.

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energy-exports  job-creation  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  north-carolina  infrastructure  ozone 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 17, 2015

Reuters: Lifting a 40-year-old U.S. ban on crude exports would create a wide range of jobs in the oil drilling supply chain and broader economy even in states that produce little or no oil, according to a report released on Tuesday.

Some 394,000 to 859,000 U.S. jobs could be created annually from 2016 to 2030 by lifting the ban, according to the IHS report, titled: "Unleashing the Supply Chain: Assessing the Economic Impact of a U.S. crude oil free trade policy."

Only 10 percent of the jobs would be created in actual oil production, while 30 percent would come from the supply chain, and 60 percent would come from the broader economy, the report said. The supply chain jobs would be created in industries that support drilling, such as oil field trucks, construction, information technology and rail.

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offshore-development  oil-and-natural-gas-access  north-carolina  outer-continental-shelf  economic-benefits 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 17, 2015

The federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) is scheduled to hold a public hearing today in Wilmington, N.C., on its draft five-year offshore oil and natural gas leasing program. According to a study by Quest Offshore Resources, developing oil and natural gas on the North Carolina outer continental shelf could bring significant benefits.

These include 55,000 jobs in the state by 2035 and nearly $4 billion in revenues for the state’s budget by 2035, with revenue sharing in place.

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american-energy  global-markets  price-of-oil  jobs  economy  keystone-xl-pipeline  fracking  north-carolina  exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 14, 2015

Even with oil prices continuing to plummet and oil companies decommissioning drilling rigs every day, the Energy Department on Tuesday projected that domestic crude production would continue to rise in 2015, although growth would slow.

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north-carolina  oil-and-natural-gas-development  economic-growth  offshore-energy-development  outer-continental-shelf  seismic-survey  safe-operations 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 8, 2014

Energy already is generating benefits for North Carolina and its economy, and things could get a lot better with the right oil and natural gas policies in place – an important point as North Carolinians get ready to vote in a U.S. Senate race that has national implications.

Advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling could get under way early next year with the finalizing of state rules for safe and responsible development.  

This fits with recent polling showing that strong majorities of registered North Carolina voters support increased domestic oil and natural gas production, including 91 percent who say more production could lead to more U.S. jobs and 89 percent who say more oil and gas could help stimulate the economy.

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american-energy  manufacturing  jobs  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  lng-exports  alaska  north-carolina 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted June 5, 2014

The Wall Street Journal (ROBERT PROFUSEK): Since the 1970s, multinational companies regularly relocated manufacturing outside the U.S., chasing what GE’s Jeff Immelt coined “labor arbitrage,” and the conventional wisdom was that U.S. manufacturing was heading to an inexorable death. The conventional wisdom has, however, proven untrue, as so often is the case.

Some of the reasons for the rebirth of manufacturing in the U.S. were the inevitable consequences of the rapid rise in industrialization in emerging market countries–think of the pollution and daily rolling brownouts in India, labor unrest and increased wage and work rule demands in China and unpredictable legal systems in many emerging market countries. But the fundamental factor driving manufacturing back to the U.S. is technology–computers and robots have further eroded the labor arbitrage, and the U.S. is the undeniable global leader in technology and innovation. At the same time, the U.S. is in the midst of an energy boom, itself technology-enabled, producing an enormous cost and reliability advantages. While this particular advantage can be expected to diminish over time, it is real and the catch-up time is likely to be long, as evidenced by China’s inability to date to exploit its own shale gas reserves cost-effectively.

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offshore-access  north-carolina  seismic  economic-growth  oil-and-natural-gas-industry 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 5, 2014

The waters off states along the Mid-Atlantic coast may hold significant new reserves of oil and natural gas, which is why the federal government should allow safe seismic testing on the outer continental shelf (OCS) there. Determining the resource base would clear the way for leasing, exploration and development that would mean jobs, revenue for government and more energy for America.

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