• Energy Infrastructure
      energy-fracking-calloutEnergy 101-Fracking
      Fracking makes it possible to produce oil and natural gas in places where conventional technologies are ineffective. Access to new wells encourages economic growth and provides energy for all Americans. Informed dialogue is critical since studies estimate that up to 80 percent of natural gas wells drilled in the next decade will require hydraulic  fracturing technology.
      PipelineEnergy 101-Keystone XL

      Canadian oil sands currently account for more than 1 million barrels/day of U.S. oil imports. The U.S. is stalling refinery and pipeline projects needed to further develop these reserves--the Keystone XL pipeline is one example. The 1,661-mile Keystone XL pipeline would deliver Canadian crude oil to Gulf of Mexico refineries, supporting jobs across America and generating $775 billion in GDP for America.

      Did You Know?
      The oil and natural gas industry supports nearly 9.2 million jobs nationwide in the United States.

      The industry contributed $476 billion in direct support to the economy in 2010.

      Increased access to our vast domestic oil and natural gas could generate more government revenue, create new jobs and significantly contribute to U.S. energy security.
      Find Out More
  • Energy 101
      energy-fracking-calloutEnergy 101-Fracking
      Fracking makes it possible to produce oil and natural gas in places where conventional technologies are ineffective. Access to new wells encourages economic growth and provides energy for all Americans. Informed dialogue is critical since studies estimate that up to 80 percent of natural gas wells drilled in the next decade will require hydraulic  fracturing technology.
      PipelineEnergy 101-Keystone XL

      Canadian oil sands currently account for more than 1 million barrels/day of U.S. oil imports. The U.S. is stalling refinery and pipeline projects needed to further develop these reserves--the Keystone XL pipeline is one example. The 1,661-mile Keystone XL pipeline would deliver Canadian crude oil to Gulf of Mexico refineries, supporting jobs across America and generating $775 billion in GDP for America.

      Did You Know?
      Global demand for energy is rising.

      Oil and natural gas currently supply 60% of America's energy needs.

      Smart policies that encourage domestic energy production will greatly benefit our nation's economy and energy security.
      Find Out More
  • Jobs
      Job_ScientistEnergy Jobs
    • Development of the Marcellus Shale alone could create 160,000 jobs in Pennsylvania, 20,000 jobs in New York and 30,000 jobs in West Virginia by 2015.
    • The opening of Florida to exploration and development could result in up to 100,000 new Florida jobs by 2016--just with increased access to federal areas within the Gulf of Mexico.
    • U.S. State Department approval of the Keystone XL pipeline could generate nearly 85,000 jobs by 2020
    • - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
    • Development of the Marcellus Shale alone could create 160,000 jobs in Pennsylvania, 20,000 jobs in New York and 30,000 jobs in West Virginia by 2015.
    • The opening of Florida to exploration and development could result in up to 100,000 new Florida jobs by 2016--just with increased access to federal areas within the Gulf of Mexico.
    • U.S. State Department approval of the Keystone XL pipeline could generate nearly 85,000 jobs by 2020
    • - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
    • Development of the Marcellus Shale alone could create 160,000 jobs in Pennsylvania, 20,000 jobs in New York and 30,000 jobs in West Virginia by 2015.
    • The opening of Florida to exploration and development could result in up to 100,000 new Florida jobs by 2016--just with increased access to federal areas within the Gulf of Mexico.
    • U.S. State Department approval of the Keystone XL pipeline could generate nearly 85,000 jobs by 2020
    • - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
    • Development of the Marcellus Shale alone could create 160,000 jobs in Pennsylvania, 20,000 jobs in New York and 30,000 jobs in West Virginia by 2015.
    • The opening of Florida to exploration and development could result in up to 100,000 new Florida jobs by 2016--just with increased access to federal areas within the Gulf of Mexico.
    • U.S. State Department approval of the Keystone XL pipeline could generate nearly 85,000 jobs by 2020
    • - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
    • Development of the Marcellus Shale alone could create 160,000 jobs in Pennsylvania, 20,000 jobs in New York and 30,000 jobs in West Virginia by 2015.
    • The opening of Florida to exploration and development could result in up to 100,000 new Florida jobs by 2016--just with increased access to federal areas within the Gulf of Mexico.
    • U.S. State Department approval of the Keystone XL pipeline could generate nearly 85,000 jobs by 2020
    • - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
      America's oil and natural gas industry supports 9.2 million men and women across the United States in a wide range of highly skilled, well-paying professions. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
      America's oil and natural gas industry supports 9.2 million men and women across the United States in a wide range of highly skilled, well-paying professions.
      Oil and natural gas companies invest in cutting-edge technology and offer fulfilling careers to the next generation of American engineers, geophysicists, chemists, earth scientists, geologists, climate experts and explorers. These individuals, working with the best technologies, will help find and recover oil and natural gas here and abroad and help secure America's energy future. In addition, the industry employs professionals that most people don't normally associate with our industry, such as botanists and marine biologists, even zoologists and veterinarians. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
      Oil and natural gas companies invest in cutting-edge technology and offer fulfilling careers to the next generation of American engineers, geophysicists, chemists, earth scientists, geologists, climate experts and explorers. These individuals, working with the best technologies, will help find and recover oil and natural gas here and abroad and help secure America's energy future. In addition, the industry employs professionals that most people don't normally associate with our industry, such as botanists and marine biologists, even zoologists and veterinarians. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
      Oil and natural gas companies invest in cutting-edge technology and offer fulfilling careers to the next generation of American engineers, geophysicists, chemists, earth scientists, geologists, climate experts and explorers.
      Energy JobsThe Future of Energy Jobs
      With the right government policies in place, the oil and natural gas industry can create more American jobs that can help grow the U.S. economy, generate substantial new revenues for government and provide greater energy security for our nation. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs#sthash.osXzBdtU.dpuf
      With the right government policies in place, the oil and natural gas industry can create more American jobs that can help grow the U.S. economy, generate substantial new revenues for government and provide greater energy security for our nation.  These individuals will help find and recover oil and natural gas here and abroad and help secure America's energy future.
      Did You Know?
      America's oil and natural gas industry currently supports nearly 9.2 million jobs.

      Expanding access to America's oil and natural gas resources can create 1.4 million jobs by 2030.

      Industry workers are not only engineers and geologists, but also botanists, zoologists and even veterinarians.
      Find Out More
  • Economy
      Gasoline PricesEconomy - Gas Prices
      "What’s up with gas prices?” is a question we get asked a lot.  Because crude oil is the primary component in gasoline production, the price rises and falls with the cost of crude—which is set by supply and demand on the global commodities market. 
      Refining the crude oil, storage, delivery and retailing further add to the cost of producing gasoline. To learn more about the factors affect gas prices, read our gas prices primer. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/economy/gas-prices#sthash.rnP14MSG.dpuf
      Refining the crude oil, storage, delivery and retailing further add to the cost of producing gasoline. To learn more about the factors affect gas prices, read our gas prices primer. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/economy/gas-prices#sthash.rnP14MSG.dpuf
      Refining the crude oil, storage, delivery and retailing further add to the cost of producing gasoline. To learn more about the factors affect gas prices, read our gas prices primer.
      Nest EggEconomy - Retirement Money
      The U.S. oil and natural gas industry supports the retirements of tens of millions of Americans who have invested in industry stock. In fact, if you have a mutual fund or IRA retirement account—and 95 million U.S. households do—there’s a good chance it invests in oil and natural gas.  Only 2.8 percent of industry shares are owned by corporate management. The rest is owned by regular Americans, many of them middle class, such as teachers, police officers and firefighters.
      Did You Know?
      The oil and natural gas industry supports nearly 9.2 million jobs nationwide in the United States.

      The industry contributed $476 billion in direct support to the economy in 2010.

      Increased access to our vast domestic oil and natural gas could generate more government revenue, create new jobs and significantly contribute to U.S. energy security.
      Find Out More
  • Energy Security
      energy securityEnergy Security - Oil and Gas
      a thriving domestic oil and gas industry is vital to America’s energy and economic security. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/energy-security#sthash.FZaAL1ou.dpuf
      a thriving domestic oil and gas industry is vital to America’s energy and economic security. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/energy-security#sthash.FZaAL1ou.dpuf
      A thriving domestic oil and gas industry is vital to America’s energy and economic security. U.S. and Canadian supplies can provide 100 percent of our liquid fuel needs by 2030 with the implementation of two straightforward policies—(1) accessing U.S. oil and natural gas reserves that are currently off-limits; and (2) partnering with our friendly neighbor to the north, Canada, in the development of the Keystone XL pipeline
      Energy In Our HandsEnergy Security - Reserves
      America holds 2 percent of the word's "proven" oil reserves. This excludes the billions of barrels of oil that's off-limits due to restrictive federal policy, classified as undiscovered, technically recoverable resources (UTRR) and not counted with the proven reserves. According to recent government estimates, that is more than 116 billion barrels of UTRR oil on federal lands. Access to these restricted reserves will generate American jobs, increase U.S. energy security and provide significant revenues to state and local governments.
      Did You Know?
      The oil and natural gas industry is vital to U.S. energy and economic security.

      The oil and natural gas industry supports 9.2 million American jobs and 7.7% of U.S. economy.

      With more access as well as Keystone pipeline construction, the United States and Canada can provide 100% of U.S. liquid fuel needs by 2030.

      2010 industry contributions to U.S. economy equal roughly 60 percent of the 2009 stimulus package.
      Find Out More
  • Environment & Safety
      Environment and SafetyEnvironmental Reviews
      America’s oil and natural gas industry has a long-standing commitment to safety and protecting the environment. The industry’s environmental investments represent a crucial aspect of today’s energy exploration and production process. Since 2008, the Keystone Pipeline has undergone the longest pipeline application deliberation in history--including five environmental reviews.
      oil safety environmentEnvironment and Safety
      Spills are rare, but when they do happen, the oil and natural gas industry and the U.S. government work together to employ the world’s leading response capabilities and minimize environmental harm. Following the Gulf oil spill, the industry has taken several steps to improve our safety mechanisms, including joining forces to build and deploy a rapid-response containment system. The industry has also created the Center for Offshore Safety, which draws on lessons learned from successful and existing safety programs.
      Did You Know?
      The industry invested $239 billion since 1990 toward improving the environmental performance of its products, facilities and operations—$777 for every man, woman and child in the United States.

      The industry invested an estimated $13 billion in emerging technologies in 2009, allowing operations to be cleaner, safer and more efficient.

      Electronic navigation and physical oceanographic systems are a large part of the reason why more than 99.9% of oil delivered by tankers during the last decade has reached its U.S destination without incident.
      Find Out More
The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Industry
Energy Tomorrow Blog
  • World Asking for U.S. Leadership on Energy

    Reuters reports that Washington is hearing from more allies who want the U.S. to lift its ban on crude oil exports, with South Korea and Mexico joining the European Union in pressing the case for U.S. oil. Reuters:

    South Korean President Park Geun-hye told a visiting U.S. delegation of lawmakers on the House of Representatives energy committee on Aug. 11 that tapping into the gusher of ultra-light, sweet crude emerging from places like Texas and North Dakota was a priority, the lawmakers said. One of South Korea's leading refiners has opened discussions with the government in Seoul over how to encourage Washington to open the taps, three sources in South Korea with direct knowledge of the matter told Reuters. Mexico is also eagerly awaiting word from the U.S. Department of Commerce on possible shipments and the EU wants U.S. oil and natural gas exports covered by a proposed trade agreement with Washington, the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership.

    >> Read More
  • The Consumer Benefits of American Energy

    Supply matters. The impact of the U.S. energy revolution on global supply, with real benefits reaching consumers, is seen we head into the Labor Day weekend. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports the U.S. average retail price for gasoline on Aug. 25 was the lowest price on the Monday before Labor Day since 2010. EIA explains:

    The recent decline in gasoline prices largely reflects changes in crude oil prices. In June of this year, the Brent spot price reached its year-to-date high of $115/barrel (bbl), then fell to $102/bbl on August 22. Current Brent prices are below their August average level over the past three years, which ranged between $110/bbl and $113/bbl.

    This parallels another EIA report, crediting the surge in U.S. crude oil production with a more stabilized global crude market:

    Record-setting liquid fuels production growth in the United States has more than offset the rise in unplanned global supply disruptions over the past few years … U.S. liquid fuels production, which includes crude oil, hydrocarbon gas liquids, biofuels, and refinery processing gain, grew by more than 4.0 million barrels per day (bbl/d) from January 2011 to July 2014, of which 3.0 million bbl/d was crude oil production growth. During that same period, global unplanned supply disruptions grew by 2.8 million bbl/d. U.S. production growth, the main factor counterbalancing the supply disruptions on the global oil market, has contributed to a decrease in crude oil price volatility since 2011.

    More simply, supply matters. Because crude oil is traded globally, every additional barrel of U.S. production going into that market has impact.

    >> Read More
  • Our Energy, Our Benefits

    New York Times: THREE RIVERS, Tex. — Whenever overseas turmoil has pushed energy prices higher in the past, John and Beth Hughes have curbed their driving by eating at home more and shopping locally. But the current crises in Ukraine and Iraq did not stop them from making the two-hour drive to San Antonio to visit the Alamo, have a chicken fried steak lunch, and buy fish for their tank before driving home to Corpus Christi.

    “We were able to take a day-cation because of the lower gas prices,” said Ms. Hughes.

    The reason for the improved economics of road travel can be found 10,000 feet below the ground here, where the South Texas Eagle Ford shale is providing more than a million new barrels of oil supplies to the world market every day. United States refinery production in recent weeks reached record highs and left supply depots flush, cushioning the impact of all the instability surrounding traditional global oil fields.

    >> Read More
  • American Energy – A Bipartisan Issue

    Despite the hyper-partisanship currently flourishing in Washington, there is a potential tie that binds: American energy.

    Thanks to advanced technologies, entrepreneurial risk-taking and abundant oil and natural gas reserves, U.S. energy is on the rise: We’re the world’s No. 1 producer of natural gas and likely to be No. 1 in crude oil production next year, according to the International Energy Agency. Our energy revolution is creating jobs, boosting the economy and increasing America’s energy security and influence in the world. It’s also a bridge to bipartisanship.

    API Executive Vice President Louis Finkel touched on these themes in a recent op-ed for the Reno Gazette-Journaland in a presentation before the Nevada state convention of the AFL-CIO. 

    >> Read More
  • America’s Economic Boom – Thanks to Fracking

    Fuel Fix Blog: The Marcellus region is now the biggest natural gas shale play in the world, and there’s still about $90 billion to be made by tapping the area’s reserves, according to a study by energy analyst group Wood Mackenzie.

    The Marcellus, which stretches from New York to West Virginia, produced about 15.6 billion cubic feet of natural gas per day in August, about 38 percent of total U.S. natural gas production for the month, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The agency doesn’t expect the boom to taper off anytime soon, and several of the biggest companies are cashing in.

    Wood Mackenzie predicted that the top 20 operators in the Marcellus will earn nearly $86 billion over the life of the play after the costs of reaching the reserves. Among the 20 largest operators are Fort Worth-based Range Resources Corp., Pittsburgh’s EQT Corp., Houston’s Cabot Oil & Gas Corp. and Denver-based Antero Resources.

    For comparison, Wood Mackenzie estimated that there’s about $118 billion to be made by extracting the resources in North Dakota’s Bakken region — but most production there is higher-priced oil compared to the natural gas dominant in the Marcellus.

    >> Read More
  • False Choices and the Anti-Fracking Crowd, Part 1

    USA Today op-ed this week on hydraulic fracturing by the Natural Resources Defense Council’s Amy Mall is such an achievement in dishonesty it’ll take multiple posts to unpack it all. So stay tuned. For now, let’s look at the opening, tone-setting paragraph of Mall’s piece and the way it deploys a false choice to try to undercut public support for fracking, the very basis of America’s ongoing energy revolution. Mall writes:

    We all want economic and energy security. But recklessly ramping up U.S. oil and gas production is not the answer.

    Mall starts with a truth – in an otherwise seriously truth-challenged piece. Yes, Americans very much want economic and energy security.

    >> Read More
  • American Energy Impacts Global Markets, Makes U.S. More Secure

    USAToday Editorial: There is much news these days from the world's major energy producing regions. Almost none of it is good.

    Iraq, Libya and Syria are in turmoil. Russia, the world's largest exporter of natural gas and the second largest exporter of oil, is bullying Ukraine and by extension Western Europe. And Iran's nuclear program may yet provoke a market-roiling conflict.

    Amazingly, as all this has transpired, U.S. gasoline prices have been stable, even falling. The domestic economy is picking up steam. And the stock market has hit all-time highs.

    Go figure. Perhaps the markets are in denial and Americans are in for an ugly surprise. They were blindsided in 1973 when an Arab oil boycott led to higher prices and long gas lines, and again in 1979 when the Iranian revolution led to a second oil shock.

    But there are legitimate reasons why things would look relatively good here while so much of the world burns. First among them is a U.S. energy renaissance that has left the nation far less dependent on Mideast oil.

    >> Read More
  • E15, Science and the Facts

    There was an interesting article last year from Ian Boyd, a chief scientific adviser in the government of the United Kingdom.  In it Boyd looks at the role that science plays in public policy, including this clarification and warning:

    Strictly speaking, the role of science should be to provide information to those having to make decisions, including the public, and to ensure that the uncertainties around that information are made clear. When scientists start to stray into providing views about whether decisions based upon the evidence are right or wrong they risk being politicised.

    This comes to mind with a recent Huffington Post article lauding a proposal that would require Chicago service stations to offer E15 fuel, authored by Michael Wang and Jennifer Dunn, scientists with the Argonne National Laboratory.

    Wang and Dunn write that mandating E15 – containing 50 percent more ethanol than the E10 gasoline that’s the staple of the U.S. fuel supply – is a “step in the right direction,” because of its environmental benefits. Actually, the Chicago ethanol mandate would be a giant leap backward for consumers, small business owners and, yes, the environment.

    >> Read More
  • This is What an Energy Superpower Looks Like

    The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has a chart showing what a number of experts have been saying – that America’s domestic energy surge has countered a rise in unexpected supply disruptions around the globe in recent years.

    EIA says U.S. liquid fuels production – including crude oil, hydrocarbon gas liquids, biofuels and refinery processing gain – grew by more than 4 million barrels per day (bpd) from January 2011 to July 2014. Of that total, 3 million bpd was growth in crude output. Over the same period unplanned global supply disruptions as calculated by EIA grew by 2.8 million bpd. The result is a more stable global market for crude.

    >> Read More
  • America’s Energy Revolution: Positive, Not Partisan

    Times Online (Pennsylvania): Matt Curry moved to Texas for work but kept his treasured Steelers season tickets in the hope he might return someday to western Pennsylvania.

    After graduating from Penn State with a degree in petroleum engineering, Curry didn't have much of a choice but to leave. He got a job that required him to travel and "bounced around the United States for a few years," the 43-year-old said recently.

    "I eventually settled in Dallas, working for multiple oil and gas companies during my time there," he said. "Around 2008, I began hearing more and more about Marcellus and Range Resources, and I saw the opportunity to move home."

    Curry is director of business development at Range Resources in Cecil Township, Washington County. He and his wife, Heather, have three children, ranging in age from 4 months to 5 years old -- "all born in Pittsburgh," said Curry, who is from Lower Burrell, Westmoreland County.
    >> Read More

About This Blog  RSS

Energy Tomorrow is brought to you by the American Petroleum Institute (API), which is the only national trade association that represents all aspects of America's oil and natural gas industry. Our more than 500 corporate members, from the largest major oil company to the smallest of independents, come from all segments of the industry. They are producers, refiners, suppliers, pipeline operators and marine transporters, as well as service and supply companies that support all segments of the industry.

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