• Energy Infrastructure
      energy-fracking-calloutEnergy 101-Fracking
      Fracking makes it possible to produce oil and natural gas in places where conventional technologies are ineffective. Access to new wells encourages economic growth and provides energy for all Americans. Informed dialogue is critical since studies estimate that up to 80 percent of natural gas wells drilled in the next decade will require hydraulic  fracturing technology.
      PipelineEnergy 101-Keystone XL

      Canadian oil sands currently account for more than 1 million barrels/day of U.S. oil imports. The U.S. is stalling refinery and pipeline projects needed to further develop these reserves--the Keystone XL pipeline is one example. The 1,661-mile Keystone XL pipeline would deliver Canadian crude oil to Gulf of Mexico refineries, supporting jobs across America and generating $775 billion in GDP for America.

      Did You Know?
      The oil and natural gas industry supports nearly 9.2 million jobs nationwide in the United States.

      The industry contributed $476 billion in direct support to the economy in 2010.

      Increased access to our vast domestic oil and natural gas could generate more government revenue, create new jobs and significantly contribute to U.S. energy security.
      Find Out More
  • Energy 101
      energy-fracking-calloutEnergy 101-Fracking
      Fracking makes it possible to produce oil and natural gas in places where conventional technologies are ineffective. Access to new wells encourages economic growth and provides energy for all Americans. Informed dialogue is critical since studies estimate that up to 80 percent of natural gas wells drilled in the next decade will require hydraulic  fracturing technology.
      PipelineEnergy 101-Keystone XL

      Canadian oil sands currently account for more than 1 million barrels/day of U.S. oil imports. The U.S. is stalling refinery and pipeline projects needed to further develop these reserves--the Keystone XL pipeline is one example. The 1,661-mile Keystone XL pipeline would deliver Canadian crude oil to Gulf of Mexico refineries, supporting jobs across America and generating $775 billion in GDP for America.

      Did You Know?
      Global demand for energy is rising.

      Oil and natural gas currently supply 60% of America's energy needs.

      Smart policies that encourage domestic energy production will greatly benefit our nation's economy and energy security.
      Find Out More
  • Jobs
      Job_ScientistEnergy Jobs
    • Development of the Marcellus Shale alone could create 160,000 jobs in Pennsylvania, 20,000 jobs in New York and 30,000 jobs in West Virginia by 2015.
    • The opening of Florida to exploration and development could result in up to 100,000 new Florida jobs by 2016--just with increased access to federal areas within the Gulf of Mexico.
    • U.S. State Department approval of the Keystone XL pipeline could generate nearly 85,000 jobs by 2020
    • - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
    • Development of the Marcellus Shale alone could create 160,000 jobs in Pennsylvania, 20,000 jobs in New York and 30,000 jobs in West Virginia by 2015.
    • The opening of Florida to exploration and development could result in up to 100,000 new Florida jobs by 2016--just with increased access to federal areas within the Gulf of Mexico.
    • U.S. State Department approval of the Keystone XL pipeline could generate nearly 85,000 jobs by 2020
    • - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
    • Development of the Marcellus Shale alone could create 160,000 jobs in Pennsylvania, 20,000 jobs in New York and 30,000 jobs in West Virginia by 2015.
    • The opening of Florida to exploration and development could result in up to 100,000 new Florida jobs by 2016--just with increased access to federal areas within the Gulf of Mexico.
    • U.S. State Department approval of the Keystone XL pipeline could generate nearly 85,000 jobs by 2020
    • - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
    • Development of the Marcellus Shale alone could create 160,000 jobs in Pennsylvania, 20,000 jobs in New York and 30,000 jobs in West Virginia by 2015.
    • The opening of Florida to exploration and development could result in up to 100,000 new Florida jobs by 2016--just with increased access to federal areas within the Gulf of Mexico.
    • U.S. State Department approval of the Keystone XL pipeline could generate nearly 85,000 jobs by 2020
    • - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
    • Development of the Marcellus Shale alone could create 160,000 jobs in Pennsylvania, 20,000 jobs in New York and 30,000 jobs in West Virginia by 2015.
    • The opening of Florida to exploration and development could result in up to 100,000 new Florida jobs by 2016--just with increased access to federal areas within the Gulf of Mexico.
    • U.S. State Department approval of the Keystone XL pipeline could generate nearly 85,000 jobs by 2020
    • - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
      America's oil and natural gas industry supports 9.2 million men and women across the United States in a wide range of highly skilled, well-paying professions. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
      America's oil and natural gas industry supports 9.2 million men and women across the United States in a wide range of highly skilled, well-paying professions.
      Oil and natural gas companies invest in cutting-edge technology and offer fulfilling careers to the next generation of American engineers, geophysicists, chemists, earth scientists, geologists, climate experts and explorers. These individuals, working with the best technologies, will help find and recover oil and natural gas here and abroad and help secure America's energy future. In addition, the industry employs professionals that most people don't normally associate with our industry, such as botanists and marine biologists, even zoologists and veterinarians. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
      Oil and natural gas companies invest in cutting-edge technology and offer fulfilling careers to the next generation of American engineers, geophysicists, chemists, earth scientists, geologists, climate experts and explorers. These individuals, working with the best technologies, will help find and recover oil and natural gas here and abroad and help secure America's energy future. In addition, the industry employs professionals that most people don't normally associate with our industry, such as botanists and marine biologists, even zoologists and veterinarians. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
      Oil and natural gas companies invest in cutting-edge technology and offer fulfilling careers to the next generation of American engineers, geophysicists, chemists, earth scientists, geologists, climate experts and explorers.
      Energy JobsThe Future of Energy Jobs
      With the right government policies in place, the oil and natural gas industry can create more American jobs that can help grow the U.S. economy, generate substantial new revenues for government and provide greater energy security for our nation. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs#sthash.osXzBdtU.dpuf
      With the right government policies in place, the oil and natural gas industry can create more American jobs that can help grow the U.S. economy, generate substantial new revenues for government and provide greater energy security for our nation.  These individuals will help find and recover oil and natural gas here and abroad and help secure America's energy future.
      Did You Know?
      America's oil and natural gas industry currently supports nearly 9.2 million jobs.

      Expanding access to America's oil and natural gas resources can create 1.4 million jobs by 2030.

      Industry workers are not only engineers and geologists, but also botanists, zoologists and even veterinarians.
      Find Out More
  • Economy
      Gasoline PricesEconomy - Gas Prices
      "What’s up with gas prices?” is a question we get asked a lot.  Because crude oil is the primary component in gasoline production, the price rises and falls with the cost of crude—which is set by supply and demand on the global commodities market. 
      Refining the crude oil, storage, delivery and retailing further add to the cost of producing gasoline. To learn more about the factors affect gas prices, read our gas prices primer. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/economy/gas-prices#sthash.rnP14MSG.dpuf
      Refining the crude oil, storage, delivery and retailing further add to the cost of producing gasoline. To learn more about the factors affect gas prices, read our gas prices primer. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/economy/gas-prices#sthash.rnP14MSG.dpuf
      Refining the crude oil, storage, delivery and retailing further add to the cost of producing gasoline. To learn more about the factors affect gas prices, read our gas prices primer.
      Nest EggEconomy - Retirement Money
      The U.S. oil and natural gas industry supports the retirements of tens of millions of Americans who have invested in industry stock. In fact, if you have a mutual fund or IRA retirement account—and 95 million U.S. households do—there’s a good chance it invests in oil and natural gas.  Only 2.8 percent of industry shares are owned by corporate management. The rest is owned by regular Americans, many of them middle class, such as teachers, police officers and firefighters.
      Did You Know?
      The oil and natural gas industry supports nearly 9.2 million jobs nationwide in the United States.

      The industry contributed $476 billion in direct support to the economy in 2010.

      Increased access to our vast domestic oil and natural gas could generate more government revenue, create new jobs and significantly contribute to U.S. energy security.
      Find Out More
  • Energy Security
      energy securityEnergy Security - Oil and Gas
      a thriving domestic oil and gas industry is vital to America’s energy and economic security. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/energy-security#sthash.FZaAL1ou.dpuf
      a thriving domestic oil and gas industry is vital to America’s energy and economic security. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/energy-security#sthash.FZaAL1ou.dpuf
      A thriving domestic oil and gas industry is vital to America’s energy and economic security. U.S. and Canadian supplies can provide 100 percent of our liquid fuel needs by 2030 with the implementation of two straightforward policies—(1) accessing U.S. oil and natural gas reserves that are currently off-limits; and (2) partnering with our friendly neighbor to the north, Canada, in the development of the Keystone XL pipeline
      Energy In Our HandsEnergy Security - Reserves
      America holds 2 percent of the word's "proven" oil reserves. This excludes the billions of barrels of oil that's off-limits due to restrictive federal policy, classified as undiscovered, technically recoverable resources (UTRR) and not counted with the proven reserves. According to recent government estimates, that is more than 116 billion barrels of UTRR oil on federal lands. Access to these restricted reserves will generate American jobs, increase U.S. energy security and provide significant revenues to state and local governments.
      Did You Know?
      The oil and natural gas industry is vital to U.S. energy and economic security.

      The oil and natural gas industry supports 9.2 million American jobs and 7.7% of U.S. economy.

      With more access as well as Keystone pipeline construction, the United States and Canada can provide 100% of U.S. liquid fuel needs by 2030.

      2010 industry contributions to U.S. economy equal roughly 60 percent of the 2009 stimulus package.
      Find Out More
  • Environment & Safety
      Environment and SafetyEnvironmental Reviews
      America’s oil and natural gas industry has a long-standing commitment to safety and protecting the environment. The industry’s environmental investments represent a crucial aspect of today’s energy exploration and production process. Since 2008, the Keystone Pipeline has undergone the longest pipeline application deliberation in history--including five environmental reviews.
      oil safety environmentEnvironment and Safety
      Spills are rare, but when they do happen, the oil and natural gas industry and the U.S. government work together to employ the world’s leading response capabilities and minimize environmental harm. Following the Gulf oil spill, the industry has taken several steps to improve our safety mechanisms, including joining forces to build and deploy a rapid-response containment system. The industry has also created the Center for Offshore Safety, which draws on lessons learned from successful and existing safety programs.
      Did You Know?
      The industry invested $239 billion since 1990 toward improving the environmental performance of its products, facilities and operations—$777 for every man, woman and child in the United States.

      The industry invested an estimated $13 billion in emerging technologies in 2009, allowing operations to be cleaner, safer and more efficient.

      Electronic navigation and physical oceanographic systems are a large part of the reason why more than 99.9% of oil delivered by tankers during the last decade has reached its U.S destination without incident.
      Find Out More
The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Industry
Energy Tomorrow Blog
  • Energy Critical to Growing Economy, Creating American Jobs

    USA Today (Manhattan Institute’s Mark Mills): When the newly elected Congress convenes in January, energy will be a priority. In fact energy is the "foundation" action item according to the just-released roadmap from Speaker of the House John Boehner. So this is a particularly good time to map out just how different the energy world is today, and will be in the future.

     

    Four decades ago, when America's extant energy policy paradigm was forged, the U.S. was the world's fastest growing major energy user in an environment of resource dependency and depletion. The facts have since flipped: America is now the fastest growing energy producer, while nearly all net new demand takes place elsewhere.

     

    In this context, consider the implications for America, and the world, of five key numbers.

    >> Read More
  • Finding the Balance on Fracking

    Credit the U.S. Forest Service for adopting a revised plan for the George Washington National Forest that will allow safe and responsible energy development using hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling.

    As others said of the plan, science won out in the sense that hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling can be conducted safely while protecting the forest itself as well as the watershed within it.

    >> Read More
  • The Benefits of America’s Offshore Energy

    Tapping the energy resources off America’s coasts could improve our economy, our energy security and create thousands of jobs. Two new studies highlight the remarkable boost to job creation, U.S. energy security, domestic investment, and revenue to the government that lies within the Pacific Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) and the Eastern Gulf of Mexico.

    API’s Group Director Erik Milito and the National Ocean Industries Association’s Randall Luthi outlined the studies for reporters during a conference call today. Milito:

    “The oil and natural gas industry is a rare bright spot in our economy, and the ability to safely develop new offshore resources is critical to America’s continued energy security and job growth.”

    >> Read More
  • The Opportunity of American Energy

    WYTV (ABC, Ohio): The Utica Shale Academy, located inside Southern Local Schools, held a special demonstration Tuesday for students and board members.

    Austin Sadler, 17, is the only senior in the academy. He hasn’t wasted any time obtaining three certifications needed to get a job in the oil and gas industry after graduation.

    Sadler said he has learned how to case a well, install pipe and tubing and understands how gas and oil is extracted from the ground. The first certification he received was for safety, called the Rig Pass.

    “It allows me to be safely on any rig. I can be on a rig and know what I am doing and what not to do,” Sadler said.

    >> Read More
  • Ozone Regulation and the Nation’s Economic Health

    A couple of data points to remember with EPA poised to propose new, lower ground-level ozone standards, perhaps as soon as next month:

    Air quality is and has been improving under the current, 75 parts per billion (ppb) standards, which are still being implemented across the country. Meanwhile, EPA reports national average ozone levels have fallen 33 percent since 1980 and 18 percent since 2000.

    Against that backdrop, EPA staff reportedly is recommending a new primary ozone standard of between 60 and 70 ppb, which could put 94 percent of the country out of compliance – potentially stunting job creation and economic growth for little, if any, health benefit.

    >> Read More
  • Keystone XL - The Facts Remain

    While the U.S. Senate fell just short of the votes needed to pass legislation advancing the long-delayed Keystone XL pipeline, the issue likely will reach President Obama’s desk when the new Congress is seated in January. API President and CEO Jack Gerard:

    “Keystone XL is not going away.  The president will have to deal with it, if not now then next year – when existing bipartisan majority support for Keystone XL in both the House and Senate will only be stronger. We will work with the new Congress to focus on getting this important jobs project approved. We will not give up until the pipeline is built. The significant gains in jobs, economic growth, energy security and national security – which have been firmly established during six years of study – prove beyond any reasonable doubt that Keystone XL is in our national interest. The national interest question is the sole consideration before President Obama, and his failure to answer it is the sole factor standing between Americans and this shovel-ready infrastructure project.”

    As the Keystone XL saga continues, opponents continue to offer up a familiar grab bag of myths, half-baked goods and distortions – all designed to keep the pipeline obstructed.  

    Nothing new, of course. Keystone XL’s merits have been established over more than six years of close public scrutiny, including five thorough environmental reviews by the U.S. State Department – all of which have similarly concluded that the pipeline would have minimal effect on the environment and that the crude oil it will deliver to the Gulf Coast would have no material impact on U.S. greenhouse gas emissions.

    The fact is Keystone XL has been studied, probed, examined, researched and analyzed like no other energy infrastructure project before it. There have been public hearings and hours of congressional debate. Through it all, Keystone XL has maintained strong support from the American people – 60 percent in a new USA Today poll.

    >> Read More
  • It’s Time to Build the Keystone XL Pipeline

    Ahead of the Senate’s vote this evening on legislation that would approve the Keystone XL pipeline project, the 1,779 mile oil pipeline project has dominated energy news today. While the Senate floor continues to see debate, and the vote looks very close, here’s what we’re reading:
    >> Read More
  • Americans Win with American Energy

    The Economist: To find out how much energy security has mattered in the Pacific’s recent history, ask the Japanese. At the museum of the Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo, which honours the country’s war dead (sometimes controversially), an exhibit suggests, with a jarring note of self-justification, that an American naval blockade against Japanese oil imports in 1941 triggered the Pacific war.

    Seventy years later a tsunami that swooshed in from the Pacific and knocked out the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station led to the closure of Japan’s 54 nuclear reactors. Parts of the country, which is a greedy consumer of electricity, were left practically powerless. Huge tankers full of natural gas, heading for terminals dotted along Japan’s Pacific coastline, eventually got the country up and running again. In 2012 Japan consumed 37% of the world’s liquefied natural gas (LNG).

    >> Read More
  • The Impacts of Bad Policies on Great Cars

    Saw a tweet last week from Jalopnik, a website “obsessed with the cult of cars and everything that moves you,” and it reminded me of an important point in the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) debate.

    First, Jalopnik doesn’t actually do a car-of-the-year award because it considers them to be so much media hype. The tweet was a little jab at car awards. Still, Matt Hardigree, the site’s editor-in-chief, says the ’94 Miata really is a great, classic car.

    Which leads to our point about the RFS: If you’re a lucky owner of a vintage Miata, don’t let E15 anywhere near its fuel tank.

    >> Read More
  • The Keystone XL Test

    Friday’s bipartisan U.S. House vote to advance the Keystone XL pipeline, the ninth time the House has voted to support the project, sets up next week’s expected vote in the Senate – and most likely a big decision point for President Obama. API President and CEO Jack Gerard:

    “The strong, bipartisan support for the Keystone XL pipeline demonstrates lawmakers from both parties in the House, as well as the Senate, are listening to the American people. A vote for KXL tells Americans their jobs matter, their futures matter and that our nation’s energy and national security are a clear priority.”

    Now the question: Is President Obama listening?

    >> Read More

About This Blog  RSS

Energy Tomorrow is brought to you by the American Petroleum Institute (API), which is the only national trade association that represents all aspects of America's oil and natural gas industry. Our more than 500 corporate members, from the largest major oil company to the smallest of independents, come from all segments of the industry. They are producers, refiners, suppliers, pipeline operators and marine transporters, as well as service and supply companies that support all segments of the industry.

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