• Energy Infrastructure
      energy-fracking-calloutEnergy 101-Fracking
      Fracking makes it possible to produce oil and natural gas in places where conventional technologies are ineffective. Access to new wells encourages economic growth and provides energy for all Americans. Informed dialogue is critical since studies estimate that up to 80 percent of natural gas wells drilled in the next decade will require hydraulic  fracturing technology.
      PipelineEnergy 101-Keystone XL

      Canadian oil sands currently account for more than 1 million barrels/day of U.S. oil imports. The U.S. is stalling refinery and pipeline projects needed to further develop these reserves--the Keystone XL pipeline is one example. The 1,661-mile Keystone XL pipeline would deliver Canadian crude oil to Gulf of Mexico refineries, supporting jobs across America and generating $775 billion in GDP for America.

      Did You Know?
      The oil and natural gas industry supports nearly 9.2 million jobs nationwide in the United States.

      The industry contributed $476 billion in direct support to the economy in 2010.

      Increased access to our vast domestic oil and natural gas could generate more government revenue, create new jobs and significantly contribute to U.S. energy security.
      Find Out More
  • Energy 101
      energy-fracking-calloutEnergy 101-Fracking
      Fracking makes it possible to produce oil and natural gas in places where conventional technologies are ineffective. Access to new wells encourages economic growth and provides energy for all Americans. Informed dialogue is critical since studies estimate that up to 80 percent of natural gas wells drilled in the next decade will require hydraulic  fracturing technology.
      PipelineEnergy 101-Keystone XL

      Canadian oil sands currently account for more than 1 million barrels/day of U.S. oil imports. The U.S. is stalling refinery and pipeline projects needed to further develop these reserves--the Keystone XL pipeline is one example. The 1,661-mile Keystone XL pipeline would deliver Canadian crude oil to Gulf of Mexico refineries, supporting jobs across America and generating $775 billion in GDP for America.

      Did You Know?
      Global demand for energy is rising.

      Oil and natural gas currently supply 60% of America's energy needs.

      Smart policies that encourage domestic energy production will greatly benefit our nation's economy and energy security.
      Find Out More
  • Jobs
      Job_ScientistEnergy Jobs
    • Development of the Marcellus Shale alone could create 160,000 jobs in Pennsylvania, 20,000 jobs in New York and 30,000 jobs in West Virginia by 2015.
    • The opening of Florida to exploration and development could result in up to 100,000 new Florida jobs by 2016--just with increased access to federal areas within the Gulf of Mexico.
    • U.S. State Department approval of the Keystone XL pipeline could generate nearly 85,000 jobs by 2020
    • - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
    • Development of the Marcellus Shale alone could create 160,000 jobs in Pennsylvania, 20,000 jobs in New York and 30,000 jobs in West Virginia by 2015.
    • The opening of Florida to exploration and development could result in up to 100,000 new Florida jobs by 2016--just with increased access to federal areas within the Gulf of Mexico.
    • U.S. State Department approval of the Keystone XL pipeline could generate nearly 85,000 jobs by 2020
    • - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
    • Development of the Marcellus Shale alone could create 160,000 jobs in Pennsylvania, 20,000 jobs in New York and 30,000 jobs in West Virginia by 2015.
    • The opening of Florida to exploration and development could result in up to 100,000 new Florida jobs by 2016--just with increased access to federal areas within the Gulf of Mexico.
    • U.S. State Department approval of the Keystone XL pipeline could generate nearly 85,000 jobs by 2020
    • - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
    • Development of the Marcellus Shale alone could create 160,000 jobs in Pennsylvania, 20,000 jobs in New York and 30,000 jobs in West Virginia by 2015.
    • The opening of Florida to exploration and development could result in up to 100,000 new Florida jobs by 2016--just with increased access to federal areas within the Gulf of Mexico.
    • U.S. State Department approval of the Keystone XL pipeline could generate nearly 85,000 jobs by 2020
    • - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
    • Development of the Marcellus Shale alone could create 160,000 jobs in Pennsylvania, 20,000 jobs in New York and 30,000 jobs in West Virginia by 2015.
    • The opening of Florida to exploration and development could result in up to 100,000 new Florida jobs by 2016--just with increased access to federal areas within the Gulf of Mexico.
    • U.S. State Department approval of the Keystone XL pipeline could generate nearly 85,000 jobs by 2020
    • - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
      America's oil and natural gas industry supports 9.2 million men and women across the United States in a wide range of highly skilled, well-paying professions. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
      America's oil and natural gas industry supports 9.2 million men and women across the United States in a wide range of highly skilled, well-paying professions.
      Oil and natural gas companies invest in cutting-edge technology and offer fulfilling careers to the next generation of American engineers, geophysicists, chemists, earth scientists, geologists, climate experts and explorers. These individuals, working with the best technologies, will help find and recover oil and natural gas here and abroad and help secure America's energy future. In addition, the industry employs professionals that most people don't normally associate with our industry, such as botanists and marine biologists, even zoologists and veterinarians. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
      Oil and natural gas companies invest in cutting-edge technology and offer fulfilling careers to the next generation of American engineers, geophysicists, chemists, earth scientists, geologists, climate experts and explorers. These individuals, working with the best technologies, will help find and recover oil and natural gas here and abroad and help secure America's energy future. In addition, the industry employs professionals that most people don't normally associate with our industry, such as botanists and marine biologists, even zoologists and veterinarians. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
      Oil and natural gas companies invest in cutting-edge technology and offer fulfilling careers to the next generation of American engineers, geophysicists, chemists, earth scientists, geologists, climate experts and explorers.
      Energy JobsThe Future of Energy Jobs
      With the right government policies in place, the oil and natural gas industry can create more American jobs that can help grow the U.S. economy, generate substantial new revenues for government and provide greater energy security for our nation. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs#sthash.osXzBdtU.dpuf
      With the right government policies in place, the oil and natural gas industry can create more American jobs that can help grow the U.S. economy, generate substantial new revenues for government and provide greater energy security for our nation.  These individuals will help find and recover oil and natural gas here and abroad and help secure America's energy future.
      Did You Know?
      America's oil and natural gas industry currently supports nearly 9.2 million jobs.

      Expanding access to America's oil and natural gas resources can create 1.4 million jobs by 2030.

      Industry workers are not only engineers and geologists, but also botanists, zoologists and even veterinarians.
      Find Out More
  • Economy
      Gasoline PricesEconomy - Gas Prices
      "What’s up with gas prices?” is a question we get asked a lot.  Because crude oil is the primary component in gasoline production, the price rises and falls with the cost of crude—which is set by supply and demand on the global commodities market. 
      Refining the crude oil, storage, delivery and retailing further add to the cost of producing gasoline. To learn more about the factors affect gas prices, read our gas prices primer. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/economy/gas-prices#sthash.rnP14MSG.dpuf
      Refining the crude oil, storage, delivery and retailing further add to the cost of producing gasoline. To learn more about the factors affect gas prices, read our gas prices primer. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/economy/gas-prices#sthash.rnP14MSG.dpuf
      Refining the crude oil, storage, delivery and retailing further add to the cost of producing gasoline. To learn more about the factors affect gas prices, read our gas prices primer.
      Nest EggEconomy - Retirement Money
      The U.S. oil and natural gas industry supports the retirements of tens of millions of Americans who have invested in industry stock. In fact, if you have a mutual fund or IRA retirement account—and 95 million U.S. households do—there’s a good chance it invests in oil and natural gas.  Only 2.8 percent of industry shares are owned by corporate management. The rest is owned by regular Americans, many of them middle class, such as teachers, police officers and firefighters.
      Did You Know?
      The oil and natural gas industry supports nearly 9.2 million jobs nationwide in the United States.

      The industry contributed $476 billion in direct support to the economy in 2010.

      Increased access to our vast domestic oil and natural gas could generate more government revenue, create new jobs and significantly contribute to U.S. energy security.
      Find Out More
  • Energy Security
      energy securityEnergy Security - Oil and Gas
      a thriving domestic oil and gas industry is vital to America’s energy and economic security. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/energy-security#sthash.FZaAL1ou.dpuf
      a thriving domestic oil and gas industry is vital to America’s energy and economic security. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/energy-security#sthash.FZaAL1ou.dpuf
      A thriving domestic oil and gas industry is vital to America’s energy and economic security. U.S. and Canadian supplies can provide 100 percent of our liquid fuel needs by 2030 with the implementation of two straightforward policies—(1) accessing U.S. oil and natural gas reserves that are currently off-limits; and (2) partnering with our friendly neighbor to the north, Canada, in the development of the Keystone XL pipeline
      Energy In Our HandsEnergy Security - Reserves
      America holds 2 percent of the word's "proven" oil reserves. This excludes the billions of barrels of oil that's off-limits due to restrictive federal policy, classified as undiscovered, technically recoverable resources (UTRR) and not counted with the proven reserves. According to recent government estimates, that is more than 116 billion barrels of UTRR oil on federal lands. Access to these restricted reserves will generate American jobs, increase U.S. energy security and provide significant revenues to state and local governments.
      Did You Know?
      The oil and natural gas industry is vital to U.S. energy and economic security.

      The oil and natural gas industry supports 9.2 million American jobs and 7.7% of U.S. economy.

      With more access as well as Keystone pipeline construction, the United States and Canada can provide 100% of U.S. liquid fuel needs by 2030.

      2010 industry contributions to U.S. economy equal roughly 60 percent of the 2009 stimulus package.
      Find Out More
  • Environment & Safety
      Environment and SafetyEnvironmental Reviews
      America’s oil and natural gas industry has a long-standing commitment to safety and protecting the environment. The industry’s environmental investments represent a crucial aspect of today’s energy exploration and production process. Since 2008, the Keystone Pipeline has undergone the longest pipeline application deliberation in history--including five environmental reviews.
      oil safety environmentEnvironment and Safety
      Spills are rare, but when they do happen, the oil and natural gas industry and the U.S. government work together to employ the world’s leading response capabilities and minimize environmental harm. Following the Gulf oil spill, the industry has taken several steps to improve our safety mechanisms, including joining forces to build and deploy a rapid-response containment system. The industry has also created the Center for Offshore Safety, which draws on lessons learned from successful and existing safety programs.
      Did You Know?
      The industry invested $239 billion since 1990 toward improving the environmental performance of its products, facilities and operations—$777 for every man, woman and child in the United States.

      The industry invested an estimated $13 billion in emerging technologies in 2009, allowing operations to be cleaner, safer and more efficient.

      Electronic navigation and physical oceanographic systems are a large part of the reason why more than 99.9% of oil delivered by tankers during the last decade has reached its U.S destination without incident.
      Find Out More
The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Industry
Energy Tomorrow Blog
  • Offshore and All-of-the-Above Energy

    Offshore energy is getting lots of attention this week, which is good. Offshore energy is vital to America’s economy and energy security.

    This week the Interior Department proposed the first draft of its next five-year program for offshore oil and natural gas leasing, in the 2017-2020 timeframe. While the draft plan doesn’t go far enough, it could include the first Atlantic lease sale in decades, and that would be a positive step. Meanwhile, on Thursday the federal government is scheduled to hold a lease sale for offshore wind in the Atlantic.

    All of the above …

    That’s more than a rhetorical flourish. America will need energy from all available sources in the future – thus the case for a genuine all-of-the-above strategy. We hope this week’s wind sale is successful.

    Energy isn’t a zero-sum game, and neither is energy job creation. Offshore energy development of any kind can generate jobs and raise significant revenue for government. The country benefits and so do individual Americans – you know, folks holding the middle-class jobs everyone wants to support.

    >> Read More
  • Good Energy Policies and American Prosperity

    The Guardian (Debbie Carlson): Ethanol was supposed to do a lot for the US. It was supposed to help reduce our dependence on foreign oil. It was supposed to combat climate change. It was supposed to be a gateway for more renewable fuels technology. It was supposed to reduce gasoline prices because it was cheaper. So when Congress mandated in 2005 that 10% of the nation’s fuel supply had to be blended with ethanol, which is derived from corn, there were some idealistic hopes that renewable fuels would wean us off fossil fuels. It hasn’t worked that way.
    >> Read More
  • Video: Time to Build Keystone XL

    A new video captures quite well the game of political football involving the Keystone XL pipeline, a game of overtime that’s making Americans wait for jobs, economic benefits and greater energy security. Some might call it deflating.

    Points underscored by the video: The White House is responsible for delaying a shovel-ready infrastructure project that would support more than 42,000 jobs during construction, according to the U.S. State DepartmentKeystone XL would put $2 billion in workers’ pockets and add $3.4 billion to U.S. GDP – again, according to the State Department. Keystone XL has cleared five separate environmental reviews – with the conclusion that the project wouldn’t significantly affect the environment, climate or otherwise. The project would strengthen America’s energy security, bringing oil from Canada and the U.S. Bakken region to the Gulf Coast for processing by U.S. refineries.

    >> Read More
  • America’s Offshore Opportunity

    Three maps, two views of America’s offshore energy wealth.

    One reflects vast offshore oil and natural gas resource potential – nearly 50 billion barrels of oil and more than 200 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. We say potential because these areas represent the 87 percent of America’s federal offshore acreage that has been closed to exploration and development, dwarfing the areas where development is allowed.    

    Nonetheless, what’s visible is the profile of an offshore energy giant, an offshore superpower. This is energy muscle waiting to be flexed. These are resources that could benefit Americans in terms of energy security, as more oil and natural gas is safely and responsibly produced right here at home, as well as job creation and economic stimulus.

    That’s what energy superpowers do. They develop their resources to increase their security in a world where secure energy is fundamental to overall security. They develop their resources to fuel economic growth and to help ensure the prosperity of their citizens.  

    >> Read More
  • American Energy Benefits You and Me

    TribLIVE: Specialized, experienced engineers are becoming a tough get in Western Pennsylvania as the gas drilling industry outpaces the growth of an experienced talent pool. Stock awards, sign-on bonuses, unlimited vacation and travel stipends are increasingly becoming necessary for companies looking to attract top candidates, recruiters say. “Sometimes, we get so lost in it, they have so much they're trying to offer and entice them with,” said Frank Civitate, founder and president of Synergy Staffing, based in Pittsburgh. “The fact of the matter is everyone is looking for the same types of folks.”
    >> Read More
  • American Energy: Disrupting the Global Energy Market

    The New York Times (Daniel Yergin): A historic change of roles is at the heart of the clamor and turmoil over the collapse of oil prices, which have plummeted by 50 percent since September. For decades, Saudi Arabia, backed by the Persian Gulf emirates, was described as the “swing producer.” With its immense production capacity, it could raise or lower its output to help the global market adjust to shortages or surpluses. But on Nov. 27, at the OPEC meeting in Vienna, Saudi Arabia effectively resigned from that role and OPEC handed over all responsibility for oil prices to the market, which the Saudi oil minister, Ali Al-Naimi, predicted would “stabilize itself eventually.” OPEC’s decision was hardly unanimous. Venezuela and Iran, their economies in deep trouble, lobbied hard for production cutbacks, to no avail. Afterward, Iran accused Saudi Arabia of waging an “oil war” and being part of a “plot” against it.
    >> Read More
  • Rhetoric vs. Action – Exports Edition

    Earlier this month, then-White House advisor John Podesta said the Obama administration is unlikely to do more on the U.S. crude oil export ban beyond the Commerce Department’s recent effort to clarify the rules for exporting ultra-light crude known as condensates. Podesta told Reuters:

    “At this stage, I think that what the Commerce Department did in December sort of resolves the debate. We felt comfortable with where they went. If you look at what's going on in the market and actions that the Department took, I think that ... there's not a lot of pressure to do more.”

    It’s a strange conclusion given the weight of scholarship that says America’s 1970s ban on crude exports should be lifted – to spur domestic production, create jobs and put downward pressure on U.S. gasoline prices. It also would solve a growing mismatch between supplies of light sweet domestic crude and a refinery sector that’s largely configured to handle heavier crudes. ConocoPhillips Chairman and CEO Ryan Lance, speaking recently at the Center for Strategic and International Studies:

    “(The condensates decision is) a help. … I question whether we’ll ever grow to a million barrels a day of condensate production, so it helps, but it doesn’t solve the problem. It doesn’t answer the issue that we’re going to have coming at us as a nation … crude that our refineries cannot refine. So it’s a help, but by no stretch does it solve the problem. We have to address the bigger issue.”  

    >> Read More
  • Sound Policy for a Sound Energy Future

    Forbes (Loren Steffy): President Obama didn’t say much about energy in his State of the Union speech Tuesday. Last year, he focused on energy issues more, and devoted much of the energy portions of his speech to natural gas. This year, he acknowledged rising U.S. oil production and the benefits of cheap energy that have come with it, and then he made a backhanded reference to the Keystone XL pipeline. In calling on both parties to support the infrastructure projects such as “modern ports, strong bridges, faster trains and faster internet,” he then encouraged lawmakers to pass a bipartisan infrastructure plan by saying: “So let’s set our sights higher than a single oil pipeline.” Certainly, the Keystone pipeline has become a far greater political punching bag than a meaningful piece of infrastructure. Environmentalists have greatly exaggerated its role in climate change, and Republicans in Congress are now determined to push through legislation supporting it almost out of spite for the administration’s foot-dragging on a decision.
    >> Read More
  • Keystone XL and Trade

    During his State of the Union speech President Obama talked about expanding trade and building up the middle class. Both good objectives. And, while a president’s annual message to Congress usually is full of goals that are mostly aspirational, both of these are attainable – through energy.

    First, the president could work to end the ban on the export of domestic crude oil, a relic of the 1970s and an era of U.S. energy scarcity. A supply of light sweet crude, mismatched for a refinery sector largely configured to handle heavier crudes, would be able to reach overseas markets. This would help support domestic production and jobs – many of them well-paying middle-class jobs – while benefitting our trade balance.

    Likewise, the administration could stop slow-walking approvals for planned U.S. liquefied natural gas (LNG) facilities to export LNG to non-free trade agreement nations – again, spurring domestic production and jobs and improving America’s trade bottom line.

    Both would increase the U.S. presence in global energy markets – expanding world supply, helping allies and strengthening American foreign policy – all consistent with our country’s status as an energy superpower.

    Second and more specifically, the president could approve the Keystone XL pipeline. It’s needed energy infrastructure that would bring more than 800,000 barrels of oil a day from Canada and the U.S. Midwest, support tens of thousands of U.S. jobs – good middle-class jobs – and help strengthen the U.S. energy/trading relationship with Canada, our No. 1 source of imported oil.

    >> Read More
  • Seizing Our Energy Moment

    The Bakken Magazine: “Do not pass Go. Do not collect $200.”

    This is the dreaded phrase on the “Go to Jail Card” that you’ve likely drawn, or at least heard of, when playing the game of Monopoly. Drawing this card is an all-around bummer. You lose a chance at scooping up valuable property before others do, you don’t get to collect $200 that you might need to purchase property, and it increases the chance that you lose the game. But at least it’s just a game. Right?

    Wrong. What many people probably don’t realize is that we’re in a real-life game similar to Monopoly, but this one is focused on the global oil market, not property. And, it just so happens that we’re stuck holding the “Do not pass Go” card.

    >> Read More

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Energy Tomorrow is brought to you by the American Petroleum Institute (API), which is the only national trade association that represents all aspects of America's oil and natural gas industry. Our more than 500 corporate members, from the largest major oil company to the smallest of independents, come from all segments of the industry. They are producers, refiners, suppliers, pipeline operators and marine transporters, as well as service and supply companies that support all segments of the industry.

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