• Energy Infrastructure
      energy-fracking-calloutEnergy 101-Fracking
      Fracking makes it possible to produce oil and natural gas in places where conventional technologies are ineffective. Access to new wells encourages economic growth and provides energy for all Americans. Informed dialogue is critical since studies estimate that up to 80 percent of natural gas wells drilled in the next decade will require hydraulic  fracturing technology.
      PipelineEnergy 101-Keystone XL

      Canadian oil sands currently account for more than 1 million barrels/day of U.S. oil imports. The U.S. is stalling refinery and pipeline projects needed to further develop these reserves--the Keystone XL pipeline is one example. The 1,661-mile Keystone XL pipeline would deliver Canadian crude oil to Gulf of Mexico refineries, supporting jobs across America and generating $775 billion in GDP for America.

      Did You Know?
      The oil and natural gas industry supports nearly 9.2 million jobs nationwide in the United States.

      The industry contributed $476 billion in direct support to the economy in 2010.

      Increased access to our vast domestic oil and natural gas could generate more government revenue, create new jobs and significantly contribute to U.S. energy security.
      Find Out More
  • Energy 101
      energy-fracking-calloutEnergy 101-Fracking
      Fracking makes it possible to produce oil and natural gas in places where conventional technologies are ineffective. Access to new wells encourages economic growth and provides energy for all Americans. Informed dialogue is critical since studies estimate that up to 80 percent of natural gas wells drilled in the next decade will require hydraulic  fracturing technology.
      PipelineEnergy 101-Keystone XL

      Canadian oil sands currently account for more than 1 million barrels/day of U.S. oil imports. The U.S. is stalling refinery and pipeline projects needed to further develop these reserves--the Keystone XL pipeline is one example. The 1,661-mile Keystone XL pipeline would deliver Canadian crude oil to Gulf of Mexico refineries, supporting jobs across America and generating $775 billion in GDP for America.

      Did You Know?
      Global demand for energy is rising.

      Oil and natural gas currently supply 60% of America's energy needs.

      Smart policies that encourage domestic energy production will greatly benefit our nation's economy and energy security.
      Find Out More
  • Jobs
      Job_ScientistEnergy Jobs
    • Development of the Marcellus Shale alone could create 160,000 jobs in Pennsylvania, 20,000 jobs in New York and 30,000 jobs in West Virginia by 2015.
    • The opening of Florida to exploration and development could result in up to 100,000 new Florida jobs by 2016--just with increased access to federal areas within the Gulf of Mexico.
    • U.S. State Department approval of the Keystone XL pipeline could generate nearly 85,000 jobs by 2020
    • - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
    • Development of the Marcellus Shale alone could create 160,000 jobs in Pennsylvania, 20,000 jobs in New York and 30,000 jobs in West Virginia by 2015.
    • The opening of Florida to exploration and development could result in up to 100,000 new Florida jobs by 2016--just with increased access to federal areas within the Gulf of Mexico.
    • U.S. State Department approval of the Keystone XL pipeline could generate nearly 85,000 jobs by 2020
    • - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
    • Development of the Marcellus Shale alone could create 160,000 jobs in Pennsylvania, 20,000 jobs in New York and 30,000 jobs in West Virginia by 2015.
    • The opening of Florida to exploration and development could result in up to 100,000 new Florida jobs by 2016--just with increased access to federal areas within the Gulf of Mexico.
    • U.S. State Department approval of the Keystone XL pipeline could generate nearly 85,000 jobs by 2020
    • - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
    • Development of the Marcellus Shale alone could create 160,000 jobs in Pennsylvania, 20,000 jobs in New York and 30,000 jobs in West Virginia by 2015.
    • The opening of Florida to exploration and development could result in up to 100,000 new Florida jobs by 2016--just with increased access to federal areas within the Gulf of Mexico.
    • U.S. State Department approval of the Keystone XL pipeline could generate nearly 85,000 jobs by 2020
    • - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
    • Development of the Marcellus Shale alone could create 160,000 jobs in Pennsylvania, 20,000 jobs in New York and 30,000 jobs in West Virginia by 2015.
    • The opening of Florida to exploration and development could result in up to 100,000 new Florida jobs by 2016--just with increased access to federal areas within the Gulf of Mexico.
    • U.S. State Department approval of the Keystone XL pipeline could generate nearly 85,000 jobs by 2020
    • - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
      America's oil and natural gas industry supports 9.2 million men and women across the United States in a wide range of highly skilled, well-paying professions. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
      America's oil and natural gas industry supports 9.2 million men and women across the United States in a wide range of highly skilled, well-paying professions.
      Oil and natural gas companies invest in cutting-edge technology and offer fulfilling careers to the next generation of American engineers, geophysicists, chemists, earth scientists, geologists, climate experts and explorers. These individuals, working with the best technologies, will help find and recover oil and natural gas here and abroad and help secure America's energy future. In addition, the industry employs professionals that most people don't normally associate with our industry, such as botanists and marine biologists, even zoologists and veterinarians. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
      Oil and natural gas companies invest in cutting-edge technology and offer fulfilling careers to the next generation of American engineers, geophysicists, chemists, earth scientists, geologists, climate experts and explorers. These individuals, working with the best technologies, will help find and recover oil and natural gas here and abroad and help secure America's energy future. In addition, the industry employs professionals that most people don't normally associate with our industry, such as botanists and marine biologists, even zoologists and veterinarians. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
      Oil and natural gas companies invest in cutting-edge technology and offer fulfilling careers to the next generation of American engineers, geophysicists, chemists, earth scientists, geologists, climate experts and explorers.
      Energy JobsThe Future of Energy Jobs
      With the right government policies in place, the oil and natural gas industry can create more American jobs that can help grow the U.S. economy, generate substantial new revenues for government and provide greater energy security for our nation. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs#sthash.osXzBdtU.dpuf
      With the right government policies in place, the oil and natural gas industry can create more American jobs that can help grow the U.S. economy, generate substantial new revenues for government and provide greater energy security for our nation.  These individuals will help find and recover oil and natural gas here and abroad and help secure America's energy future.
      Did You Know?
      America's oil and natural gas industry currently supports nearly 9.2 million jobs.

      Expanding access to America's oil and natural gas resources can create 1.4 million jobs by 2030.

      Industry workers are not only engineers and geologists, but also botanists, zoologists and even veterinarians.
      Find Out More
  • Economy
      Gasoline PricesEconomy - Gas Prices
      "What’s up with gas prices?” is a question we get asked a lot.  Because crude oil is the primary component in gasoline production, the price rises and falls with the cost of crude—which is set by supply and demand on the global commodities market. 
      Refining the crude oil, storage, delivery and retailing further add to the cost of producing gasoline. To learn more about the factors affect gas prices, read our gas prices primer. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/economy/gas-prices#sthash.rnP14MSG.dpuf
      Refining the crude oil, storage, delivery and retailing further add to the cost of producing gasoline. To learn more about the factors affect gas prices, read our gas prices primer. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/economy/gas-prices#sthash.rnP14MSG.dpuf
      Refining the crude oil, storage, delivery and retailing further add to the cost of producing gasoline. To learn more about the factors affect gas prices, read our gas prices primer.
      Nest EggEconomy - Retirement Money
      The U.S. oil and natural gas industry supports the retirements of tens of millions of Americans who have invested in industry stock. In fact, if you have a mutual fund or IRA retirement account—and 95 million U.S. households do—there’s a good chance it invests in oil and natural gas.  Only 2.8 percent of industry shares are owned by corporate management. The rest is owned by regular Americans, many of them middle class, such as teachers, police officers and firefighters.
      Did You Know?
      The oil and natural gas industry supports nearly 9.2 million jobs nationwide in the United States.

      The industry contributed $476 billion in direct support to the economy in 2010.

      Increased access to our vast domestic oil and natural gas could generate more government revenue, create new jobs and significantly contribute to U.S. energy security.
      Find Out More
  • Energy Security
      energy securityEnergy Security - Oil and Gas
      a thriving domestic oil and gas industry is vital to America’s energy and economic security. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/energy-security#sthash.FZaAL1ou.dpuf
      a thriving domestic oil and gas industry is vital to America’s energy and economic security. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/energy-security#sthash.FZaAL1ou.dpuf
      A thriving domestic oil and gas industry is vital to America’s energy and economic security. U.S. and Canadian supplies can provide 100 percent of our liquid fuel needs by 2030 with the implementation of two straightforward policies—(1) accessing U.S. oil and natural gas reserves that are currently off-limits; and (2) partnering with our friendly neighbor to the north, Canada, in the development of the Keystone XL pipeline
      Energy In Our HandsEnergy Security - Reserves
      America holds 2 percent of the word's "proven" oil reserves. This excludes the billions of barrels of oil that's off-limits due to restrictive federal policy, classified as undiscovered, technically recoverable resources (UTRR) and not counted with the proven reserves. According to recent government estimates, that is more than 116 billion barrels of UTRR oil on federal lands. Access to these restricted reserves will generate American jobs, increase U.S. energy security and provide significant revenues to state and local governments.
      Did You Know?
      The oil and natural gas industry is vital to U.S. energy and economic security.

      The oil and natural gas industry supports 9.2 million American jobs and 7.7% of U.S. economy.

      With more access as well as Keystone pipeline construction, the United States and Canada can provide 100% of U.S. liquid fuel needs by 2030.

      2010 industry contributions to U.S. economy equal roughly 60 percent of the 2009 stimulus package.
      Find Out More
  • Environment & Safety
      Environment and SafetyEnvironmental Reviews
      America’s oil and natural gas industry has a long-standing commitment to safety and protecting the environment. The industry’s environmental investments represent a crucial aspect of today’s energy exploration and production process. Since 2008, the Keystone Pipeline has undergone the longest pipeline application deliberation in history--including five environmental reviews.
      oil safety environmentEnvironment and Safety
      Spills are rare, but when they do happen, the oil and natural gas industry and the U.S. government work together to employ the world’s leading response capabilities and minimize environmental harm. Following the Gulf oil spill, the industry has taken several steps to improve our safety mechanisms, including joining forces to build and deploy a rapid-response containment system. The industry has also created the Center for Offshore Safety, which draws on lessons learned from successful and existing safety programs.
      Did You Know?
      The industry invested $239 billion since 1990 toward improving the environmental performance of its products, facilities and operations—$777 for every man, woman and child in the United States.

      The industry invested an estimated $13 billion in emerging technologies in 2009, allowing operations to be cleaner, safer and more efficient.

      Electronic navigation and physical oceanographic systems are a large part of the reason why more than 99.9% of oil delivered by tankers during the last decade has reached its U.S destination without incident.
      Find Out More
The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Industry
Energy Tomorrow Blog
  • Activists vs. Reality: Economic Growth, Human Progress Won't Be Stranded

    Interesting question: Might climate change laws and regulations negatively impact the value of oil reserves held by energy companies, to the point of “stranding” them, ultimately affecting shareholders? Two companies, ExxonMobil and Shell, essentially have told their shareholders, no – because projected increases in global energy demand will continue to require all viable energy sources, including oil and natural gas, into the foreseeable future. From ExxonMobil’s report to shareholders:

    For several years, our Outlook for Energy has explicitly accounted for the prospect of policies regulating greenhouse gas emissions (GHG). This factor, among many others, has informed investments decisions that have led ExxonMobil to become the leading producer of cleaner-burning natural gas in the United States, for example. Based on this analysis, we are confident that none of our hydrocarbon reserves are now or will become “stranded.” We believe producing these assets is essential to meeting growing energy demand worldwide, and in preventing consumers – especially those in the least developed and most vulnerable economies – from themselves becoming stranded in the global pursuit of higher living standards and greater economic opportunity.

    >> Read More
  • All of the Above Energy Benefits All Americans

    AEI Carpe Diem Blog

    gas oil july 2014

    The chart above helps to illustrate the significance of America’s shale oil and gas boom by showing the combined domestic output of US oil and gas (in quadrillion BTUs, EIA data here). After production of conventional oil and gas peaked around 1970 at almost 45 quadrillion BTUs, there was a gradual, steady decline that continued until about 2005, when combined production had dropped to a 43-year low of 31.85 quadrillion BTUs, the lowest level since 1962. If that trend had continued, the US would now be producing only about 30 quadrillion BTUs of oil and gas (or less), which would have put us back to the production level of the late 1950s.

    >> Read More
  • A Commitment to Offshore Safety

    The recent International Oil Spill Conference (IOSC) in Savannah, Ga., underscored the oil and natural gas industry’s continuing commitment to safe energy development – using new technologies and deployed expertise to quickly and appropriately respond in the event of an accidental spill.

    Below, check out a new video featuring conference attendees, talking about IOSC’s valuable role in bringing together experts, service providers and government officials in the broad effort to keep improving the safety of offshore oil and natural gas development.

    >> Read More
  • Energy Access, Rising Production Boost America

    Recent Improvements in Petroleum Trade Balance Mitigate U.S. Trade Deficit

     

    EIA Today in Energy: Since the mid-1970s, the United States has run a deficit in merchandise trade, meaning that payments for imports exceeded receipts for exports. This large and growing deficit on the merchandise trade balance reached a maximum of $883 billion in the second quarter of 2008.

     

    As a result of the recession, dramatic declines of imports in excess of exports during the fourth quarter of 2008 and the first quarter of 2009 reduced the merchandise trade deficit by 49%, to $449 billion in the second quarter of 2009. This trend of declining imports resulted in the lowest quarterly deficit level since early 2002. The merchandise trade deficit then increased to $686 billion in the fourth quarter of 2013, with much of the difference from the 2008 level ($131 billion) attributable to a $158 billion increase in net exports of crude oil and petroleum products.

    >> Read More
  • Choosing Energy – Choosing Growth, Security

    Washington Examiner: The Obama administration announced Friday that it would allow exploration for oil and gas off some portions of the Atlantic Coast using sonic testing devices that environmentalists say harm marine life.

     

    The Interior Department's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management gave the OK for seismic airgun testing, which are boat-towed cannons that shoot sonar blasts off the ocean floor to scan for oil-and-gas deposits, in the mid- and south-Atlantic areas that stretch from the Delaware Bay to just south of Cape Canaveral, Fla. The approval is a prelude to potential offshore drilling there, though that is blocked through 2017 under President Obama's five-year offshore drilling plan.

    "The bureau has identified a path forward that addresses the need to update the nearly four-decade-old data in the region while protecting marine life and cultural sites,” said Acting BOEM Director Walter D. Cruickshank, who noted the agency has several permits on hand to conduct the seismic tests. “The bureau's decision reflects a carefully analyzed and balanced approach that will allow us to increase our understanding of potential offshore resources while protecting the human, marine and coastal environments.”

    >> Read More
  • E85: Fill ‘Er Up and Up and Up and …

    Check out our new cartoon, which pokes fun at what actually is pretty big drawback with E85, the fuel containing up to 85 percent ethanol that some think is key to salvaging the flawed Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).   

    Sure, it’s a cartoon. But it helps illustrate a real dilemma with E85 – its significant fuel economy disadvantage compared to the E10 fuel that’s the staple of the U.S. fuel supply.

    Basically, because ethanol is less energy-dense than gasoline, fuel that’s up to 85 percent ethanol gets fewer miles per gallon than fuel that’s only 10 percent ethanol. Here’s a sample search from the Energy Department’s fuel economy comparison tool, which shows this in specific vehicle types – fewer mpg with E85, higher average annual fuel costs. 

    >> Read More
  • Welcome Progress on Atlantic OCS Development

    The federal decision to take the next step on developing a good portion of the oil and natural gas likely to be found on the Atlantic outer continental shelf (OCS) – at least 4.7 billion barrels of oil and 37.5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas – is good, welcome and certainly significant in the effort to increase access to U.S. energy reserves.

    >> Read More
  • Energy Lifts U.S. Manufacturing, Refining Sectors

    AEI Carpe Diem Blog: Below are four charts and two maps that help tell the story of America’s Amazing Shale Oil Revolution:

    bigthree1

    >> Read More
  • Louisiana and the Benefits of Embracing Energy

    We like to bring attention to good-news energy stories from states like North Dakota (also here and here) because the oil and natural gas development there is creating good-paying jobs for Americans, generating opportunity and lifting economies. The great news is that the benefits from the U.S. energy revolution are being felt in a number of places.

    new study shows the tremendous positive impacts of energy development in Louisiana, the nation’s No. 2 crude oil producer at nearly 1.45 million barrels per day when federal offshore production is included, and No. 2 in petroleum refining capacity.

    The quick story: Louisiana has embraced oil and natural gas development,  and oil and natural gas development has embraced Louisiana – with jobs, economic stimulus and revenues for state and local governments. This is clear from the study of the state impact of the oil and natural gas extraction, refining and pipeline industries by economist Loren C. Scott.

    >> Read More
  • Energy: America’s Growth Industry

    Tyler (Texas) Morning Telegraph: VME Fabricators plans to double its Tyler workforce by year’s end and has surpassed goals set a year ago when the city and county agreed to tax abatements, representatives announced on Monday.

    VME Fabricators is a new operating division and subsidiary of VME Process Inc., an international business based in Tyler. It provides offshore oil and gas separation and processing products.

    VME Fabricators, which now has more than 50 employees in Tyler, was founded to serve onshore production needs for customers in the United States, providing module and pipe fabrication services. Its first orders will be shipped out in August, officials said in a prepared statement.

    “As the domestic oil and gas market continues to grow, so will VME as we gain onshore market share and loyalty with customers needing reliable fabrication services,” Greg Jean, vice president and general manager of VME Fabricators, said in an email.

    >> Read More

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Energy Tomorrow is brought to you by the American Petroleum Institute (API), which is the only national trade association that represents all aspects of America's oil and natural gas industry. Our more than 500 corporate members, from the largest major oil company to the smallest of independents, come from all segments of the industry. They are producers, refiners, suppliers, pipeline operators and marine transporters, as well as service and supply companies that support all segments of the industry.

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