• Energy Infrastructure
      energy-fracking-calloutEnergy 101-Fracking
      Fracking makes it possible to produce oil and natural gas in places where conventional technologies are ineffective. Access to new wells encourages economic growth and provides energy for all Americans. Informed dialogue is critical since studies estimate that up to 80 percent of natural gas wells drilled in the next decade will require hydraulic  fracturing technology.
      PipelineEnergy 101-Keystone XL

      Canadian oil sands currently account for more than 1 million barrels/day of U.S. oil imports. The U.S. is stalling refinery and pipeline projects needed to further develop these reserves--the Keystone XL pipeline is one example. The 1,661-mile Keystone XL pipeline would deliver Canadian crude oil to Gulf of Mexico refineries, supporting jobs across America and generating $775 billion in GDP for America.

      Did You Know?
      The oil and natural gas industry supports nearly 9.2 million jobs nationwide in the United States.

      The industry contributed $476 billion in direct support to the economy in 2010.

      Increased access to our vast domestic oil and natural gas could generate more government revenue, create new jobs and significantly contribute to U.S. energy security.
      Find Out More
  • Energy 101
      energy-fracking-calloutEnergy 101-Fracking
      Fracking makes it possible to produce oil and natural gas in places where conventional technologies are ineffective. Access to new wells encourages economic growth and provides energy for all Americans. Informed dialogue is critical since studies estimate that up to 80 percent of natural gas wells drilled in the next decade will require hydraulic  fracturing technology.
      PipelineEnergy 101-Keystone XL

      Canadian oil sands currently account for more than 1 million barrels/day of U.S. oil imports. The U.S. is stalling refinery and pipeline projects needed to further develop these reserves--the Keystone XL pipeline is one example. The 1,661-mile Keystone XL pipeline would deliver Canadian crude oil to Gulf of Mexico refineries, supporting jobs across America and generating $775 billion in GDP for America.

      Did You Know?
      Global demand for energy is rising.

      Oil and natural gas currently supply 60% of America's energy needs.

      Smart policies that encourage domestic energy production will greatly benefit our nation's economy and energy security.
      Find Out More
  • Jobs
      Job_ScientistEnergy Jobs
    • Development of the Marcellus Shale alone could create 160,000 jobs in Pennsylvania, 20,000 jobs in New York and 30,000 jobs in West Virginia by 2015.
    • The opening of Florida to exploration and development could result in up to 100,000 new Florida jobs by 2016--just with increased access to federal areas within the Gulf of Mexico.
    • U.S. State Department approval of the Keystone XL pipeline could generate nearly 85,000 jobs by 2020
    • - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
    • Development of the Marcellus Shale alone could create 160,000 jobs in Pennsylvania, 20,000 jobs in New York and 30,000 jobs in West Virginia by 2015.
    • The opening of Florida to exploration and development could result in up to 100,000 new Florida jobs by 2016--just with increased access to federal areas within the Gulf of Mexico.
    • U.S. State Department approval of the Keystone XL pipeline could generate nearly 85,000 jobs by 2020
    • - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
    • Development of the Marcellus Shale alone could create 160,000 jobs in Pennsylvania, 20,000 jobs in New York and 30,000 jobs in West Virginia by 2015.
    • The opening of Florida to exploration and development could result in up to 100,000 new Florida jobs by 2016--just with increased access to federal areas within the Gulf of Mexico.
    • U.S. State Department approval of the Keystone XL pipeline could generate nearly 85,000 jobs by 2020
    • - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
    • Development of the Marcellus Shale alone could create 160,000 jobs in Pennsylvania, 20,000 jobs in New York and 30,000 jobs in West Virginia by 2015.
    • The opening of Florida to exploration and development could result in up to 100,000 new Florida jobs by 2016--just with increased access to federal areas within the Gulf of Mexico.
    • U.S. State Department approval of the Keystone XL pipeline could generate nearly 85,000 jobs by 2020
    • - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
    • Development of the Marcellus Shale alone could create 160,000 jobs in Pennsylvania, 20,000 jobs in New York and 30,000 jobs in West Virginia by 2015.
    • The opening of Florida to exploration and development could result in up to 100,000 new Florida jobs by 2016--just with increased access to federal areas within the Gulf of Mexico.
    • U.S. State Department approval of the Keystone XL pipeline could generate nearly 85,000 jobs by 2020
    • - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
      America's oil and natural gas industry supports 9.2 million men and women across the United States in a wide range of highly skilled, well-paying professions. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
      America's oil and natural gas industry supports 9.2 million men and women across the United States in a wide range of highly skilled, well-paying professions.
      Oil and natural gas companies invest in cutting-edge technology and offer fulfilling careers to the next generation of American engineers, geophysicists, chemists, earth scientists, geologists, climate experts and explorers. These individuals, working with the best technologies, will help find and recover oil and natural gas here and abroad and help secure America's energy future. In addition, the industry employs professionals that most people don't normally associate with our industry, such as botanists and marine biologists, even zoologists and veterinarians. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
      Oil and natural gas companies invest in cutting-edge technology and offer fulfilling careers to the next generation of American engineers, geophysicists, chemists, earth scientists, geologists, climate experts and explorers. These individuals, working with the best technologies, will help find and recover oil and natural gas here and abroad and help secure America's energy future. In addition, the industry employs professionals that most people don't normally associate with our industry, such as botanists and marine biologists, even zoologists and veterinarians. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs/job-creation#sthash.F6BZxdmO.dpuf
      Oil and natural gas companies invest in cutting-edge technology and offer fulfilling careers to the next generation of American engineers, geophysicists, chemists, earth scientists, geologists, climate experts and explorers.
      Energy JobsThe Future of Energy Jobs
      With the right government policies in place, the oil and natural gas industry can create more American jobs that can help grow the U.S. economy, generate substantial new revenues for government and provide greater energy security for our nation. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/jobs#sthash.osXzBdtU.dpuf
      With the right government policies in place, the oil and natural gas industry can create more American jobs that can help grow the U.S. economy, generate substantial new revenues for government and provide greater energy security for our nation.  These individuals will help find and recover oil and natural gas here and abroad and help secure America's energy future.
      Did You Know?
      America's oil and natural gas industry currently supports nearly 9.2 million jobs.

      Expanding access to America's oil and natural gas resources can create 1.4 million jobs by 2030.

      Industry workers are not only engineers and geologists, but also botanists, zoologists and even veterinarians.
      Find Out More
  • Economy
      Gasoline PricesEconomy - Gas Prices
      "What’s up with gas prices?” is a question we get asked a lot.  Because crude oil is the primary component in gasoline production, the price rises and falls with the cost of crude—which is set by supply and demand on the global commodities market. 
      Refining the crude oil, storage, delivery and retailing further add to the cost of producing gasoline. To learn more about the factors affect gas prices, read our gas prices primer. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/economy/gas-prices#sthash.rnP14MSG.dpuf
      Refining the crude oil, storage, delivery and retailing further add to the cost of producing gasoline. To learn more about the factors affect gas prices, read our gas prices primer. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/economy/gas-prices#sthash.rnP14MSG.dpuf
      Refining the crude oil, storage, delivery and retailing further add to the cost of producing gasoline. To learn more about the factors affect gas prices, read our gas prices primer.
      Nest EggEconomy - Retirement Money
      The U.S. oil and natural gas industry supports the retirements of tens of millions of Americans who have invested in industry stock. In fact, if you have a mutual fund or IRA retirement account—and 95 million U.S. households do—there’s a good chance it invests in oil and natural gas.  Only 2.8 percent of industry shares are owned by corporate management. The rest is owned by regular Americans, many of them middle class, such as teachers, police officers and firefighters.
      Did You Know?
      The oil and natural gas industry supports nearly 9.2 million jobs nationwide in the United States.

      The industry contributed $476 billion in direct support to the economy in 2010.

      Increased access to our vast domestic oil and natural gas could generate more government revenue, create new jobs and significantly contribute to U.S. energy security.
      Find Out More
  • Energy Security
      energy securityEnergy Security - Oil and Gas
      a thriving domestic oil and gas industry is vital to America’s energy and economic security. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/energy-security#sthash.FZaAL1ou.dpuf
      a thriving domestic oil and gas industry is vital to America’s energy and economic security. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.api.tst/energy-security#sthash.FZaAL1ou.dpuf
      A thriving domestic oil and gas industry is vital to America’s energy and economic security. U.S. and Canadian supplies can provide 100 percent of our liquid fuel needs by 2030 with the implementation of two straightforward policies—(1) accessing U.S. oil and natural gas reserves that are currently off-limits; and (2) partnering with our friendly neighbor to the north, Canada, in the development of the Keystone XL pipeline
      Energy In Our HandsEnergy Security - Reserves
      America holds 2 percent of the word's "proven" oil reserves. This excludes the billions of barrels of oil that's off-limits due to restrictive federal policy, classified as undiscovered, technically recoverable resources (UTRR) and not counted with the proven reserves. According to recent government estimates, that is more than 116 billion barrels of UTRR oil on federal lands. Access to these restricted reserves will generate American jobs, increase U.S. energy security and provide significant revenues to state and local governments.
      Did You Know?
      The oil and natural gas industry is vital to U.S. energy and economic security.

      The oil and natural gas industry supports 9.2 million American jobs and 7.7% of U.S. economy.

      With more access as well as Keystone pipeline construction, the United States and Canada can provide 100% of U.S. liquid fuel needs by 2030.

      2010 industry contributions to U.S. economy equal roughly 60 percent of the 2009 stimulus package.
      Find Out More
  • Environment & Safety
      Environment and SafetyEnvironmental Reviews
      America’s oil and natural gas industry has a long-standing commitment to safety and protecting the environment. The industry’s environmental investments represent a crucial aspect of today’s energy exploration and production process. Since 2008, the Keystone Pipeline has undergone the longest pipeline application deliberation in history--including five environmental reviews.
      oil safety environmentEnvironment and Safety
      Spills are rare, but when they do happen, the oil and natural gas industry and the U.S. government work together to employ the world’s leading response capabilities and minimize environmental harm. Following the Gulf oil spill, the industry has taken several steps to improve our safety mechanisms, including joining forces to build and deploy a rapid-response containment system. The industry has also created the Center for Offshore Safety, which draws on lessons learned from successful and existing safety programs.
      Did You Know?
      The industry invested $239 billion since 1990 toward improving the environmental performance of its products, facilities and operations—$777 for every man, woman and child in the United States.

      The industry invested an estimated $13 billion in emerging technologies in 2009, allowing operations to be cleaner, safer and more efficient.

      Electronic navigation and physical oceanographic systems are a large part of the reason why more than 99.9% of oil delivered by tankers during the last decade has reached its U.S destination without incident.
      Find Out More
The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Industry
Energy Tomorrow Blog
  • The Importance of Fracking

    A new study details the essential tie between America’s ongoing energy revolution and advanced technologies of hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling. Specifically, virtually every barrel of domestic oil production growth over the past five years can be attributed to fracking and horizontal drilling – which has positively impacted global crude markets and saved consumers billions of dollars.

    Kyle Isakower, API vice president for regulatory and economic policy, discussed the ICF International study during a conference call. The study calculates the impact of safe fracking and horizontal drilling on crude markets and prices at the pump. Isakower:

    “Economists are still debating where the markets might go from here. But for the average consumer, there’s no question that America’s energy revolution has provided a welcome source of savings. … By comparing historical price and production data against a scenario without advanced drilling, it paints a clear picture of where we would be without the technology-driven energy revolution.”

    >> Read More
  • No Tricks, Just Treats – America’s Energy Revolution

    Reuters: U.S. chocolate demand may get an extra boost from an unlikely source this Halloween: the U.S. shale revolution.

    With an abundance of crude oil due to the country's fracking boom pushing average U.S. retail gasoline prices to their lowest in four years, consumers have spare change to buy sweets at gas station stores, Hershey President and Chief Executive Officer John Bilbrey said on Wednesday.

    "You could say that we benefit because people aren't spending as much at the pump and they're going inside," Bilbrey said in a conference call with investors to discuss quarterly earnings.

    >> Read More
  • Surging U.S. Energy = Real Consumer Benefits

    The Wall Street Journal: A planned Trans- Canada Corp. oil pipeline designed to ship crude from Western Canada to Eastern Canadian refineries could also be used to access the Gulf Coast, creating an end-run around U.S. permitting delays for the Keystone XL pipeline, according to the company’s chief executive.

     

    TransCanada’s proposed 1.1 million-barrel-a-day Energy East pipeline has been positioned in Canada as a nation-building project to connect Alberta’s landlocked oil sands with refineries in Quebec and coastal New Brunswick. But Chief Executive Russ Girling said it would also open up a new route to ship heavy crude by tanker to refineries on the Gulf Coast without requiring U.S. approval, unlike the more direct Keystone XL route from Alberta to Texas.

     

    “We can actually go all the way to the Gulf Coast without a presidential permit,” he said in an interview. “Once we’re on the water, we’ll show up just like any other crude oil in the world in the Houston ship channel.”

    >> Read More
  • 40 Years Of Energy Data

    October marks a birthday for our friends at the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Forty years ago, October 1974, EIA issued its first Monthly Energy Review (MER) – a report loaded with energy-related data and charts that’s a must-read for folks who follow energy issues. EIA Chief Adam Sieminski:

    That first MER was under 50 pages and featured 3 years of data focused on fossil fuels.  Today, the MER is four times as large, features data extending back 65 years, and contains information on renewable energy, emissions, energy consumption by sector, and a host of other critical subjects. In a vastly more complex energy environment, the MER continues to integrate many kinds of energy data from a wide variety of sources into one product that provides policymakers, journalists, analysts, and other concerned citizens with a comprehensive look at integrated energy data in the United States.

    Certainly, much has changed over four decades. America’s energy outlook has pivoted almost 180 degrees. Check out this snippet from that October 1974 inaugural issue of MER:

    >> Read More
  • Shale = Bright U.S. Energy Future

    Real Clear Politics: Few policy objectives over the last half-century have proven as tantalizing for presidents as the call to achieve energy independence.

    In 1973 -- as a gasoline shortage consumed the nation -- President Richard Nixon outlined Project Independence 1980, “a series of plans and goals set to insure that by the end of this decade, Americans will not have to rely on any source of energy beyond our own.” Gerald Ford, in his 1975 State of the Union address, called for “a massive program” to ease demand and increase supply “to achieve the independence we want by 1985.” Jimmy Carter, more modestly, aimed for the United States to cut its dependence on foreign oil by half by the end of the 1980s.

    Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama all set similar goals at different points in their presidential campaigns or presidencies. Typically, their political opponents did too. Little serious progress toward those goals was achieved during most of their terms in office.

    >> Read More
  • Secretary Jewell on Fracking

    In an interview with the Huffington Post, U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, in just a handful of minutes, does a pretty good job answering some of the most common attacks on hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling made by opponents of fracking – many of whom apparently want no part of the job creation, increased U.S. energy security and reduced emissions of methane and carbon dioxide that safe and responsible fracking brings. Jewell:

    “Fracking has been around for over 60 years. It is the ability to actually unlock oil and gas from reservoirs away from the wellbore. New techniques with directional drilling and staged fracking have enabled people to direct those fractures into formations that release a lot of oil and gas a long way away – maybe two miles from the actual wellhead.”

    In a nutshell she describes the marriage of advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling that is responsible for America’s ongoing energy renaissance – dramatically increasing domestic oil and natural gas production from vast shale reserves to the point where the U.S. now is No. 1 in the world in natural gas production and is expected to be No. 1 in oil output soon.

    >> Read More
  • Government’s Broken Windows

    Ever heard of the broken window fallacy? In economic circles, it’s a common parable used to dismiss arguments that damage – like the breaking of a window – has a silver lining: spending to fix the window boosts the window repairman, which boosts the folks who make panes of glass and so forth.

    Yet, that argument (and the one depicted in the broken window parable) misses a big unseen – there’s no free lunch in spending to repair or rebuild property. The money comes from somewhere. The person who must buy a new window spends money he or she might have invested or spent elsewhere in the economy, with greater economic impact. Likewise with government spending. Those dollars came from taxpayers who might have invested or spent elsewhere in the economy, with greater economic impact.

    We say all of this because another common argument being heard is that tossing bricks of energy regulation will invigorate the energy sector.

    >> Read More
  • Thriving Energy Industry Means a Thriving Economy

    Rigzone: The economic benefits to the United States from the energy industry have more than doubled in just the past ten years, even after accounting for inflation, according to a new study by The Perryman Group. The growth in the industry is worth about $1.2 trillion in gross product each year, the study noted, adding that the growth in the oil and gas industry since the economic recession has been “dramatic.” In fact, since the start of the economic recovery, the energy industry has contributed about 30 percent of the total job growth for the nation, Dr. Ray Perryman, president and CEO of The Perryman Group, said.

    While it is generally recognized that a thriving oil and gas sector helps to create new jobs within and outside of the energy sector, it is less well-recognized just how important the industry is to overall employment. However, the study shows just how large a role the energy industry plays in the number of new jobs in the country.

    >> Read More
  • Energy’s Benefits for America

    Friends of U.S. Chamber of Commerce Blog: American free enterprise can achieve almost anything. But, only if we allow it to work properly (this requires a nimble regulatory environment and a streamlined permitting process). One stark example of this gone wrong is the increasingly evergreen example of the Keystone XL pipeline, a project that is projected to create 42,000 new jobs and generate 4 billion in economic activity. So far, we've waited 6 years for a response on the permit request.

    Studies have been conducted. Talking heads and scientists have hashed out all the pros and cons. And despite broad affirmation and support, the American people are stuck waiting for Washington to act. Six years is a disgrace; bigger things can be done in far less time.

    >> Read More
  • American Energy is Breaking Records, Providing the Energy Americans Need

    Bloomberg: U.S. companies will export more energy than they import by 2025 as shale oil and gas production keeps climbing and the transportation sector becomes more efficient, Wood Mackenzie Ltd. said in a note today.

    Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing in hydrocarbon-rich layers of shale rock have boosted U.S. oil and gas production by 42 percent in the past seven years. The U.S. vehicle fleet will become 40 percent more energy-efficient by 2030, said James Brick, a senior analyst at the Edinburgh-based research firm.

    “A country can achieve energy independence through two channels,” Brick said in the note. “It can either produce more or consume less, and the U.S. is doing both.”

    >> Read More

About This Blog  RSS

Energy Tomorrow is brought to you by the American Petroleum Institute (API), which is the only national trade association that represents all aspects of America's oil and natural gas industry. Our more than 500 corporate members, from the largest major oil company to the smallest of independents, come from all segments of the industry. They are producers, refiners, suppliers, pipeline operators and marine transporters, as well as service and supply companies that support all segments of the industry.

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