The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

analysis  methane  natural-gas-development  safe-operations  air-quality  epa34  american-petroleum-institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 8, 2015

Before getting into the latest in a series of research studies on energy-related methane emissions, it’s important to stay focused on the big picture. 

Data from EPA’s Greenhouse Gas Inventory Report published this spring shows that net methane emissions from natural gas production fell 38 percent from 2005 to 2013 – even as natural gas production rose dramatically. Also: Methane emissions from hydraulically fractured natural gas wells declined 79 percent from 2005 to 2013, EPA found.

That’s the appropriate context for 11 new studies just published in the scientific journal Environmental Science & Technology, reporting research in the Barnett Shale play in North Texas. The studies follow others coordinated by the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF).  One released in 2013 found that methane emissions from natural gas drilling were a fraction of previous estimates. Another released earlier this year found that that vast majority of natural gas facilities – from the production phase to distribution via inter- and intra-state pipeline networks – recorded methane loss rates of below 1 percent.

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analysis  new-york  shale-energy  epa34  hydraulic-fracturing  natural-gas-development  economic-growth  safe-operations 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 11, 2015

Nowhere in the United States is there more to learn from EPA’s recent water/fracking study than in the state of New York.

Six months ago Gov. Andrew Cuomo banned hydraulic fracturing as too hazardous. Though the Cuomo administration conducted no original research of its own, the governor said no to fracking, no to jobs and economic growth – especially in the state’s struggling Southern Tier. He all but extinguished the hopes of many upstaters for a home-grown economic miracle – like the one occurring next door in Pennsylvania, thanks to fracking – one that would help save family farms, let children and grandchildren live and prosper where they were raised and help ensure economic security for thousands.

Yet, EPA’s five-year, multi-million-dollar study says the governor’s concerns are basically baseless, that safe hydraulic fracturing doesn’t threaten the nation’s drinking water.

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news  natural-gas-development  bp234  energy-exports  north-dakota  permian-basin  e1534  seismic 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 9, 2015

BP Magazine – Why is natural gas the fuel of the future? Despite pressures on the industry today – with gas prices down and capital investment under pressure – longer term trends still point to the increasing significance of natural gas in the energy mix. BP Magazine looks at some of the numbers behind the story of the world’s strongest-growing and cleanest fossil fuel.

Over the next 20 years, natural gas is expected to catch up with oil and coal and emerge as the main hydrocarbon component of a more sustainable energy mix. The fastest-growing fossil fuel – which is primarily methane – is mainly used for power generation, as well as in homes, offices, shops and other commercial locations for heating and cooling. It’s also a raw material in the production of fertilizer and other chemicals – and it is sometimes used as a fuel for transport as well.

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news  infrastructure  investments  energy-exports  hydraulic-fracturing  california  chevron  exxonmobil  natural-gas-development  epa34  renewable-fuel-standard  ethanol 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 3, 2015

The Hill: House Republicans have found reasons to agree with some parts of the Obama administration’s energy infrastructure proposal.

GOP leaders in the House Energy and Commerce Committee told Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz that they are largely in agreement on the need to improve pipelines, electric transmission lines, energy storage and other pieces of infrastructure.

Moniz testified at the hearing to promote the Quadrennial Energy Review, which the administration released in April to call for comprehensive infrastructure improvements worth billions of dollars.

“Many people are even asking — not surprisingly — is there enough common ground between our efforts and the Obama administration to enact meaningful energy legislation,” Rep. Ed Whitfield (R-Ky.), chairman of the energy and power subcommittee, said at the Tuesday hearing.

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analysis  pennsylvania  energy-industry  severance-tax  natural-gas-development  economic-impacts 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 18, 2015

Sometimes, amid the back and forth of discussions over energy policy, it’s helpful to talk about the real-world impacts of various policy choices.  

Right now in Pennsylvania, a proposed natural gas severance tax that would supersede the state’s existing impact fee is being debated vigorous – chiefly because the current impact fee has been good for the commonwealth, very good.

It’s been so good that some question the wisdom of swapping the current system for a severance tax – especially given a recent study showing that the net effect likely would be less energy development, resulting in billions in economic losses and nearly 18,000 fewer jobs supported by 2025. We’ve likened it to the proverbial folly of killing the golden egg-laying goose.

So, if the current impact fee has been good for Pennsylvania, can we be more specific? Yes.

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news  energy-exports  crude-oil  refineries  hydraulic-fracturing  energy-prices  natural-gas-development  arctic  safe-operations  michigan 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 18, 2015

Wall Street Journal: BRUSSELS—The European Union is increasing pressure on Washington to include an energy chapter in a planned trans-Atlantic trade deal that would allow U.S. exports of natural gas and oil and reduce the bloc’s dependency on Russia.

In an interview with The Wall Street Journal, Maros Sefcovic, the EU’s energy chief, said that easing flows of liquefied natural gas and crude oil from the U.S. to the EU is one of the bloc’s goals for the trans-Atlantic trade and investment partnership, or TTIP, that is currently under negotiation. The U.S. has so far resisted an energy chapter in TTIP, but the shale-gas boom in the U.S. and the EU’s trouble with Russia have pushed the issue into focus.

“We believe that the energy chapter in TTIP…could make a quite important contribution to the mutually beneficial trade exchange, but also to the energy security of the EU,” Mr. Sefcovic said.

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news  energy-exports  crude-oil  shale-energy  canada  hydraulic-fracturing  natural-gas-development  arctic  china 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 13, 2015

The Hill: Sens. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) and Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.) have introduced a bill to lift the 40-year-old ban on crude oil exports.

The bill would fulfill one of Murkowski’s biggest energy priorities and allow American oil companies to export crude oil as they do petroleum products. It would also allow exports of condensate, a type of light crude oil.

“America’s energy landscape has changed dramatically since the export ban was put in place in the 1970s. We have moved from energy scarcity to energy abundance. Unfortunately, our energy policies have not kept pace,” Murkowski said in a statement.

“This legislation builds from bipartisan ideas, linking energy security and infrastructure to expanding exports and helping our allies. Our nation has an opportunity to embrace its role as a global energy powerhouse, sending a signal to the world that we are open for business and will stand by our friends in need.”

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natural-gas-development  methane  emission-reductions  epa34  greenhouse-gas-emissions  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  production  regulation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 16, 2015

For months we’ve argued that new federal regulation targeting methane emissions from energy development is unnecessary and could undermine the success industry initiatives already are achieving. Howard Feldman, API’s senior director of regulatory and scientific affairs, from earlier this year:

“Methane is the product we bring to market. We sell methane – that is natural gas. That’s what we want to sell. … We don’t need regulation to tell us to do that because we are incentivized to do that. It’s not a byproduct or something. It is the product we’re selling. … We’re developing these technologies because we want to more and more capture natural gas.”

This is exactly what’s happening, as new data from EPA shows.

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energy-tax-hikes  pennsylvania  natural-gas-development  economic-benefits  fracking 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 6, 2015

More on the plan by new Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf to increase taxes on energy production in the commonwealth.

As lawmakers mull over Wolf’s proposal to add a 5 percent tax on the value of natural gas at the wellhead, plus 4.7 cents per thousand cubic feet of gas extracted – effectively a 7.5 percent tax, according to Cabot Oil & Gas Corp.’s George Stark – the key issue is its potential effect on future energy development in Pennsylvania.

Certainly, fundamental economics holds that if you tax something more, you’ll almost certainly get less of it. And that should give lawmakers pause.

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new-york  natural-gas-development  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  safe-operations  fracking  economic-benefits  pennsylvania 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 17, 2014

Here’s what you need to know about the Cuomo administration’s decision to ban hydraulic fracturing in New York: After more than six years of a state moratorium on natural gas development using fracking, after two years of reviewing the fracking research of others, after seeing safe fracking work in more than 30 states – including neighboring Pennsylvania, where fracking is generating billions in tax revenues, allowing the distribution of hundreds of millions of dollars to communities, as well as billions in royalty payments to private landowners – Gov. Andrew Cuomo and his team took the path that’s 180 degrees in the wrong direction for New York.

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