The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

crude-oil-exports  oil-production  trade  monthly-stats-report 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 16, 2018

Lots of positive energy data points in API’s newest Monthly Statistical Report – and one that’s potentially concerning.

The good is that the U.S. tied its record for crude oil production in July at 10.7 million barrels per day (b/d) and set a new one for natural gas liquids, 4.4 million b/d. With total liquids production up by more than 2 million b/d compared to July 2017, the U.S. has accounted for almost all of the growth in world oil production so far in 2018 – more than compensating for production losses elsewhere around the world.

Now the potential point of concern. The U.S. petroleum trade balance retreated in July, perhaps the result – at least in part – of trade tensions prompted by new U.S. tariffs. Crude export were down 240,000 b/d last month, and refined products exports decreased 220,000 b/d.


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trade  crude-oil-exports  china 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 20, 2018

Two charts pretty well capture the what’s at stake for U.S. energy – specifically exports of domestic crude oil – in an intensifying trade standoff between the United States and China.

According to U.S. Energy Information Administration figures, this is a very big deal. Big as in U.S. crude oil exports to China accounted for about one-fifth of all U.S. oil exports in 2017 – growing from basically nothing in 2013 to 81.6 million barrels last year.

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crude-oil-exports  refineries  gasoline-prices  energy-policy 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted June 14, 2018

With Wall Street Journal headlines such as “Trans-Atlantic Oil-Price Spread Soars as Supply Glut Disappears,” it might be hard to remember that the United States’ domestic oil production stood at a record 10.5 million barrels per day (mb/d) in April, and the nation’s petroleum trade balance is in its best position in 50 years. This has reinforced U.S. energy security, lowered the trade deficit and boosted economic growth.

That said, given our country’s much improved energy outlook, some may question why we’re still importing crude oil and refined products. And, while we’re still importing oil, why do we export domestic crude – especially when prices have risen at the pump?  Why don’t we just keep American oil at home? ... 

Answers are found in an understanding of basic market realities.

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exports  crude-oil-exports  lng-exports  chevron  refining-distribution 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 10, 2017

We’ve talked quite a bit about the way America’s energy renaissance is benefiting consumers, supporting the economy, strengthening our security, reducing U.S. energy-related carbon emissions to 25-year lows and bringing overseas wealth into this country through the export of crude oil and natural gas.

There’s even more: U.S. exports of refined petroleum products are soaring. Here’s a chart developed from U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) data, showing that exports of refined products have more than doubled in the past decade to about 3 million barrels per day…

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100-days  lng-exports  crude-oil-exports  economic-growth  us-energy-security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 13, 2017

A new era of U.S. energy exports is under way. The United States started freely trading crude oil in January 2016, following congressional legislation to end a 1970s-era ban on exports. The same month the first cargo of U.S. LNG produced from shale left Cheniere Energy’s Sabine Pass export terminal. Last month, export volumes from Sabine Pass reached a record 1.476 billion cubic feet of gas equivalent, according to Platts Analytics. Exports of LNG and crude oil both offer multiple economic benefits.

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crude-oil-exports  gasoline-prices  consumers  domestic-oil-production  eia34 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 9, 2016

Looking back, the weight of scholarship and analysis had predicted that, rather than cause higher pump prices here at home as some claimed, exporting domestic crude would put downward pressure on U.S. gasoline prices. In fact, that’s what we’re seeing – abundant crude oil supply benefiting American consumers. U.S. crude exports are part of that market dynamic – while also helping to support domestic production and strengthening America’s balance of trade.

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state-of-american-energy  poll  energy-policy  economic-security  ethanol  jobs  offshore-production  infrastructure  crude-oil-exports 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted January 7, 2016

At this year’s State of American Energy event, we highlighted the impact of energy policy on the lives and livelihoods of families and businesses in every state. The connection between policy and pocketbooks is evident after a year in which Americans saved an average $550 per driver on gasoline, due largely to strong U.S. oil and natural gas production. But to maintain the economic and security benefits of America’s 21st century energy renaissance, we’ll need to make smart policy choices that increase access to energy resources, encourage infrastructure development, rein in misguided ethanol policy and curb costly, duplicative regulations.

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state-of-american-energy  oil-and-natural-gas-production  economic-growth  jobs  us-energy-security  crude-oil-exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 5, 2016

There are many ways to gauge the current strength of American energy. The U.S. is producing nearly twice as much oil as it did less than a decade ago, which, combined with natural gas output, has made America the world’s leading producer.

Yet, the real-world impact of America’s energy revolution offers a more meaningful picture. New tensions are roiling the Middle East, yet global crude markets have remained relatively calm – unimaginable a few years ago. Meanwhile, a tanker carrying U.S. crude oil left port headed for Europe – the first since the lifting of America’s 40-year-old ban on domestic exports. There’s the reach of our energy revolution.

In his State of American Energy remarks, API President and CEO Jack Gerard focused on the growth of U.S. energy and its benefits – and also the opportunity to sustain them with sound energy policies based on facts and science.

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crude-oil-exports  lng-exports  economic-growth  oil-and-natural-gas-production  us-energy-security  trade 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 4, 2016

As we write, the United States is once again an exporter of crude oil. Sure, in the past the federal government has allowed limited crude exports. The oil tanker that left the Port of Corpus Christi, Texas, late last week is the bearer of the first freely traded U.S. crude in about four decades – made possible by congressional legislation that President Obama signed to end a 1970s-era ban on exports. It’s a new day indeed.

But wait, there’s more. Cheniere Energy  says it has begun liquefying natural gas at its new export terminal in Louisiana, setting the stage for its first LNG export cargo this month.

Both are big-time energy developments for the United States – opportunities created by a domestic energy revolution largely driven by safely harnessing vast shale reserves with advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling. 

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crude-oil-exports  economic-growth  oil-production  jobs  us-energy-security 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted December 22, 2015

Almost exactly 40 years after it was instated, the ban on crude exports has been lifted. A relic of ‘70s-era energy scarcity, the ban makes no sense now that the United States leads the world in oil and natural gas production. Numerous studies have found that lifting the ban will help put downward pressure on gas prices, create jobs, grow our economy and lower our trade deficit.

Lifting the ban is also a security win for the U.S. and our allies. With the administration’s push to allow Iran to export its oil to the global market, it’s time for U.S. producers to have the same opportunity. Our allies around the world are eager to reduce their reliance on energy from less friendly nations.

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