The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

natural-gas  lng-exports  trade  economic-growth  us-energy-security  energy-department 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 16, 2017

The global LNG market is developing, and the spot market’s growing liquidity could favor U.S. exporters, already benefiting from abundant domestic supply and ready access to the Panama Canal. America has the natural gas and access to markets. Artificial restrictions on LNG export project development should be removed. The potential benefits to the United States are significant. 

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natural-gas  pipelines  infrastructure  electricity  new-hampshire  maine  vermont  rhode-island  connecticut  massachusetts 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 15, 2017

The solution is more natural gas pipeline capacity, by building new lines or by expanding existing ones. New England policymakers should foster infrastructure by considering fair and appropriate financing mechanisms to help pay for new projects and by working to build community support for safe and responsible project development. This is the sensible path to keep New England’s consumers from paying more than is necessary for their energy.

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100-days  natural-gas  electricity  emission-reductions  environmental-impact 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 13, 2017

American natural gas is the answer to a number of energy and climate questions. It’s generating the power we need for our homes and businesses, providing the building blocks for our manufacturing renaissance and making our nation and our allies more secure.

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maryland  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  natural-gas  jobs  economic-growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 1, 2017

Maryland lawmakers pushing for a permanent state ban on hydraulic fracturing should touch base with their constituents first. A new Goucher College poll finds that among those who have an opinion on fracking, most don’t want the state to make the current fracking moratorium permanent. Goucher surveyed 776 people earlier this month and found 40 percent oppose banning hydraulic fracturing, with 36 percent supporting a ban.

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natural-gas  ghg-regulations  policy 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted February 23, 2017

When the U.S. Senate returns to work, repealing the Bureau of Land Management’s “venting and flaring rule” should be a top priority. The redundant and technically flawed rule, which went into effect last month, could negatively impact production – some say it already has. The House has voted for repeal under the Congressional Review Act (CRA), and the Senate should follow the House’s lead.

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consumers  natural-gas  nuclear  connecticut 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 10, 2017

A pillar of a sound energy policy, nationally and in the states, is letting markets work. Let the marketplace and consumers determine an energy source’s viability – based on affordability, efficiency, usefulness and other market factors. Unfortunately, Connecticut is considering legislation that would go the other direction, providing market-distorting government subsidies for nuclear power generation that could negatively impact consumers.

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power-past-impossible  everything  oil34  natural-gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 8, 2017

API’s first-ever Super Bowl ad, announcing the launch of our new “Power Past Impossible” communications campaign, had a few folks online questioning the ad’s connection between oil and space exploration – questions we’ll show are off-base later in this post.

Confusion by some about oil and space flight actually points to the main thrust of the ad and the campaign: Natural gas and oil are much, much more than just fuels. Oil and gas are all around us – in paint, makeup, the components in bionic parts, life-saving medical technology, clean fuels, space suits and … rockets. When you start thinking about it, the list is virtually endless.

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regulation  blm34  methane  natural-gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 3, 2017

Last week we encouraged Congress to use the Congressional Review Act to repeal the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) technically flawed and redundant venting and flaring rule. It appears lawmakers are poised to do just that – concerned that the rule could discourage future energy investment on Indian and federal lands, where production trails output on state and private land, and that it risks negatively impacting supplies of affordable energy to American consumers and businesses. Good reasons all to axe BLM’s rule. Likewise, repeal would be responsive to the specific concerns of voices in the West, where vast acreages are under federal control.

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100-days  natural-gas  infrastructure  energy-policies  trump 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted January 26, 2017

The first 100 days of a new presidential administration present an opportunity to establish priorities that will guide government policy for the next four years. Maintaining and strengthening the U.S. advantage as the world’s leading producer and refiner of oil and natural gas should be a top focus – not only for our energy security but for the economic, national security and environmental benefits oil and natural gas reliably provide.

The American people have a firm understanding of the importance of oil and natural gas. Recent survey results reveal that more than 80 percent of voters agree that U.S. oil and natural gas production can help achieve each of their most important priorities: job creation, economic growth, lower energy costs and energy security.

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policy  natural-gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 19, 2017

Late this month or in early February, let’s hope Congress uses the Congressional Review Act to fast-track the repeal of a number of the Obama administration’s late regulatory thrusts that could needlessly hinder domestic energy development.

A top priority for CRA repeal should be the so-called venting and flaring rule developed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) that went into effect this week. BLM’s rule is technically flawed and redundant, and it could impede the technological innovations that have led to increased domestic use of cleaner-burning natural gas – the main reason U.S. energy-related carbon emissions have fallen to levels not seen since the early 1990s.

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